STARTLING-RAINBOW SWORD (JINGHONG JIAN)

驚虹劍術
THE ART OF THE STARTLING-RAINBOW SWORD
尹千合
by Yin Qianhe
[published by 北辰出版社 Pole Star Press (and printed by 廣益印書局 Good Advice Printing House), Sep 1, 1960]

[translation by Paul Brennan, Jan, 2014]

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - cover

國術叢書之九
Chinese Martial Arts Book Collection #9:
驚虹劍術
The Art of the Startling-Rainbow Sword
尹千合自署
– calligraphy by Yin Qianhe

目次
CONTENTS

一、序一
One: First Preface [by Shen Honglie]
二、序二
Two: Second Preface [by Chen Panling]
三、自序
Three: Author’s Preface
四、國術總論
Four: General Introduction to Chinese Martial Arts
五、練國術之修養及應持之態度
Five: Moral Attitudes to Adhere to in Martial Arts Training
六、練國術四要
Six: Four Requirements for Practicing Martial Arts
七、練國術應注意事項
Seven: Things to Pay Attention to When Practicing Martial Arts
八、劍術槪論
Eight: General Introduction to the Sword Art
九、舞劍訣要
Nine: Secrets of Sword Practice
十、劍歌二首
Ten: A Couple of Sword Songs
十一、學劍數記
Eleven: A Few Pointers for Learning the Sword
十二、驚虹劍術各勢名稱順序
Twelve: Startling-Rainbow Sword Posture Names in Sequence
十三、方向圖
Thirteen: Orientation Chart
十四、學名術名動作說明及姿勢圖(附圖五十二幀)
Fourteen: The Scholarly Names, Technical Names, Movement Descriptions, and Photos of the Postures (including fifty-two [fifty-one] photos)
十五、驚虹劍擊雜談
Fifteen: Some Things I Have to Say About the Art of the Startling-Rainbow Sword
十六、論造劍法
Sixteen: On the Making of Swords

[The three prefaces are all recycled from Yin’s Baduanjin and Taiji Sword manuals (both published in 1958) with but a few alterations. In chapters 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, and 13, Yin reuses material from his Taiji Sword manual, but has for this book mostly reworked such sections into greatly expanded versions, making this the more comprehensive of his two sword books.]

一、序一
ONE: PREFACE BY SHEN HONGLIE

吾人精神之興旺,學問事業之發展,以身體健康為前提,故欲立已立人,達已達人,必先重視體育,朝夕鍛鍊,終身不懈,是之謂自強,一國民族之隆替,文化之高低,以全民強弱以為斷,故欲發揚文化,丕振國威,必須普及體育。由團體而社會,由都市而鄉村,是之謂強種,體育種類繁多,如田徑球類,已為世界及我國所通行,允宜積極鍛鍊,為國爭光,若專就我國習慣環境言,則以國術之不需設備,不擇場地,不限時間、人數、不耗任何資金等,在我國目前財力物力困難之際,實較易於普及,况國術重視三合,即心與意合,意與氣合,氣與力合,使心常定,而神常凝,所謂技也近乎道,其所崇奉之武德,為急公好義,扶危濟傾,倘運用得已,則於強身強種之中,足為保鄉衛國之助。
方九一八與七七事變間,余負責青島軍政責任,時值艱危,用是整軍經武,提倡國術,冶六十萬市民於一爐,以備殺敵,迨七七變起,日本軍民被迫下旗歸國,其焚燒日本九大紗廠之使命,即由國術教官高芳先楊慶先等,領導國術隊所完成。旋奉令主魯,高楊二氏仍追隨抗戰。尹君千合夙嫻國術,率所練壯士數百人携手抗戰,時全省各軍,厲行國術訓練,殺敵剿匪,高、楊、尹三君之建樹特多,國術衛國,於茲益信。
魯青民性忠勇篤實,自戡亂變起,多隨政府遷臺,高、楊、尹三氏亦隨軍到達,公餘之頃,仍以國術授徒,年來尹君服務教育界,從游者衆,特撰國術叢書,以為業餘教課,書成乞序於余,余自維畢生愛好國術,於技術實少心得,但年近八旬,老而不衰,確信深受其賜,當茲科學昌明,武器發達時代,吾人欲步武列強,須研究高深科學,尤應健全基層文化,促進國民健康,對易於普及之國術,未可忽視,尹君自強不息,而念念不忘於強種衛國之大義,是書之作,裨益於國術之普及者甚多,緣撮往事,以誌其凡。
丁酉仲冬竟陵沈鴻烈書於臺中旅次
The flourishing of our spirit as well as the growth of all our education and enterprise is based first of all upon the health of the body. Therefore if we wish to stand both individually and together, and to succeed both individually and together, we must start by giving importance to physical education, training daily and lifelong. This is what is meant by strengthening the self.
     The rise or fall of the people of a nation, the superiority or inferiority of their culture is dependent entirely on the strength or weakness of the people. Therefore if we wish to develop culturally and rouse national prestige, we must popularize physical education, establishing it in organizations and societies, cities and rural areas. This is what is meant by strengthening the masses.
     There are so many kinds of physical education, such as track and field events or ball sports, which are now in vogue in our nation as they are in the rest of the world. It might be appropriate for us to train in such things, but if we instead choose to glorify our nation by concentrating on our customary native martial arts, they do not require special equipment or specific facilities, are not restricted by schedule or size of a group, nor do they cost any money, which means that due to the present strained state of our economy, they are significantly easier to popularize.
     Chinese martial arts attach importance to the “three unions”: mind united with intention, intention united with energy, energy united with power. This causes the mind to be always stable and the spirit always focused, and thus it is said that skill approaches the Way. Martial virtue is thereby put on a pedestal, being minded toward the public good and to the deliverance of those in distress. Once we make use of such a realization, then the strengthening of oneself and the strengthening of the masses is all that is required in the cause of protecting one’s home and defending the nation.
     Between the Mukden Incident [Sep 18, 1931] and the Marco Polo Bridge Incident [July 7, 1937], I was in charge of the administration of the military in Qingdao. Throughout that time, the nation was under threat and so we built up the nation’s military strength by promoting martial arts. Some sixty thousand townspeople were trained [“smelted in the furnace”] in preparation to fight the enemy. When the Marco Polo Bridge Incident occurred, Japanese soldiers and civilians were forced to have diplomatic relations broken off and leave because of the mission to burn nine large Japanese cotton mills conducted by the martial arts teachers Gao Fangxian and Yang Qingxian, who each led a team of martial artists to accomplish this. Soon they both received orders to take control of Shandong, continuing the resistance against the Japanese. Yin Qianhe is a long-time martial arts adept who led several hundred warriors that he had trained for the struggle against Japan. At that time, the armies throughout the whole province were being rigorously drilled in martial arts. In fighting the enemy and smiting the invaders, Gao, Yang, and Yin made an especially large contribution, boosting confidence in the potential of martial arts to defend the nation.
     The people of Qingdao are loyal and brave, honest and sincere, and so because of the shift in power since the rebellion, many of them followed the government in its relocation to Taiwan. Being in the army, Gao, Yang, and Yin came along as well. In their spare time, they still teach martial arts. In recent years, Yin has been a schoolteacher and a great many have learned from him. He decided to spend his time after teaching classes to write contributions to the Chinese Martial Arts Book Collection. Once he had completed these books, he sought a preface from me. Although I have loved martial arts my whole life, I have actually not obtained much in the way of skill, and yet I am now in my eighth decade but not at all a feeble man, and so I am entirely convinced that I have gained by it.
     Science is now flourishing and this is an era of development in weaponry. If we wish to walk among the great powers, we need to engage in advanced scientific research, and we especially have to solidify our cultural foundation in order to promote the health of the people. In this regard, the easiest way is the popularization of Chinese martial arts, which cannot be overlooked. Yin ceaselessly strives to improve himself, constantly keeping in mind the grand principle of strengthening the people and defending the nation, and herein lies the reason for making such books. To greatly benefit the spread of martial arts is why he is writing this material down.
     – written by Shen Honglie of Jingling while visiting Taizhong, Dec, 1957

二、序二
TWO: PREFACE BY CHEN PANLING

國術為中國固有之文化,及獨特之學術,歷代富國強兵,多賴斯道,其理論之高深,技術之精妙,駕乎各國技擊之上,大則可以強種衛國,小則可以益壽延年,近數十年來,國人醉心西洋運動,使數千年來,我先賢所遺留之國粹,不能發揚廣大,致我民族衰弱不能挽救,彌深浩漢!
劍術一道,為我國歷史上最高尚之技擊,惜因向重自身力行,甚少筆之於書,後學旣乏參證,只有暗中摸索,因而劍術精華幾乎失傳,尹君千合字百洽,山東人,通文事而擅國術,造詰頗深,致力研究,歷久不懈,深感國術日衰,願將所學及研究所得,作有系統之著述,以廣流傳,近著之太極劍、驚虹劍、術強身保健功集錦、國術基本動、十二路潭腿等,內容豐富,理論透澈,致用週詳,實對國術一大貢獻。
余一生提倡國術,來臺後仍抱素志,意在普及國民教育,促進國民健康,期達強種救國之目的,現尹君之著述,其立意與吾志同,故樂為之序。
中民國四十七年十二月 陳泮嶺序於臺中寓所
Martial arts are the most characteristic part of Chinese culture, distinctive skills which throughout history have brought the nation wealth and made its armies formidable. By often depending on such methods, theories became profound and techniques exquisite, above and beyond the martial arts of other nations. On a larger scale, they can strengthen the masses and defend the nation. On a smaller scale, they can add years to your life. However, in the last few decades, the people of our nation have become infatuated with Western exercises, rendering the several-millennia worth of cultural essence bequeathed to us by our worthy ancestors unable to flourish, thereby resulting in our people becoming weak and hopeless, and this is truly a pitiable situation.
     The sword art is the most revered of these skills in our nation’s history. Unfortunately, because it stresses personal endeavor, very few books have been written about it. Later generations of students have had little to consult, left to merely feel around in the dark. Because of this, the essence of the sword art has pretty much disappeared. Yin Qianhe, or Baiqia, of Shandong is well-read and an expert in martial arts, and he has investigated them deeply, devotedly researching for a long time without slackening. As he deeply feels that our martial arts are in daily decline, he wishes to put forth what he has learned and discovered by writing it down in a systematic way to further spread these teachings. Recently he has written Taiji Sword, The Art of the Startling-Rainbow Sword, Assorted Health & Fitness Exercises, Basic Chinese Martial Arts Movements, Twelve-Line Tantui, and so on. They are rich in content, with theory clearly presented and with function fully detailed, truly making a great contribution toward our martial arts.
     I have encouraged the practice of Chinese martial arts my entire life, and have maintained my ambition to do so since coming to Taiwan. I wish to spread such an education among the people and boost their health. The aim is to rescue the nation through strengthening the people. Now Yin has written his books, and since he and I are of the same mind, I am only too happy to make a preface for him.
     – written by Chen Panling at his home in Taizhong, Dec, 1958

三、自序
THREE: AUTHOR’S PREFACE

余才疏學淺,技藝拙劣,何敢冒昧著述,貽笑方家,祗以個人深受國術利益,未敢自私,欲介紹全國同胞,尤其體弱多病者,勤於練習,期能轉弱為強,以此自愛愛人之心,激動勇氣,用作拋磚引玉之計。
本人幼時多病,年二十猶羸弱,藥石罔効,父母憂之,同里傅廷杰先生,精通國術,商請就學,期年而宿疾霍然,愈增響往之心,時太極專家安定邦先生,服務於北平強健體育社,乃負笈請益,安師技藝精絕,循循善誘,朝夕勤練,幸窺門徑,精力充沛,與一往判若兩人,抗戰軍興,追隨吾魯沈主席鴻烈,供職軍旅,沈公夙夕提倡國術,是為軍事教練主科,本人以嗜好所在,奉行尤謹,殺敵剿匪,裨助良多。
自共匪叛國,即隨政府遷台,服務中部教育界,青年愛好國術者,多隨從練習,不得不力自振奮,繼續鍛鍊,承國術先進陳泮嶺先生,不時指示,國術名家王樹金先生,鄉長宋憲亭委員多方鼓勵,於課餘揣摩研究,在探討所得,無論少林太極,槍、刀、劍、棍、等,凡合乎生理衛生,應用自衛者,無不筆之於書,計内家有八段錦,強身保健功集錦、太極拳、太極劍等,外家有少林拳基本動作三十二式、十二路潭腿、四路查拳、太祖長拳等,器械有槍、刀、劍、棍等,日積月累,蘶然成帙,並荷好友劉伍桂君惠予攝影,成書數集。自維寄處寳島,旣限於人力物力,又參考書籍缺乏,凡所論列,但憑記憶師教及個人研究所得而成,誤漏滋多,安能問世,惟以友好催促,同學堅請,是以付梓,除「太極劍」、「牀上健身術與科學八段錦」二書早已印行,荷蒙社會人士及同道愛護外,茲陸績提出強身保健功集錦,少林拳基本動作三十二勢,十二路潭腿,驚虹劍術等書。深望海内外國術名宿,邦人君子,摘我瑕疵,以匡不逮,是所厚幸
中華民國四十九年八月一日 山東尹千合(百洽)序於寳島彰化
I have but little talent and shallow learning, and my skill level is quite inferior. How could I presume to make books and invite ridicule from experts? It is simply because the great benefit I have received from martial arts I would not dare to keep to myself. I want to share it with my compatriots throughout the whole nation, particularly those who are weak or often ill. With constant practice, martial arts can turn the weak into the strong. As I do this out of a mentality of self-love and caring for others, I have roused my courage in hopes that my small efforts will bring about a large benefit.
     When I was young, I was constantly ill. Once I became an adult, I was still frail and weak. Medicines had been having no effect, to the great anxiety of my parents, but in our town there was a Fu Tingjia, who was an expert in martial arts, so they asked him to give me instruction. After just a year, all my chronic ailments had quickly been cured, and I was also inspired to take it further. At that time, the Taiji expert An Dingbang was teaching at the Beijing Health & Fitness Society, so I left home to approach him for instruction. His skill was exquisite, his teaching method was systematic and patient. I trained hard from morning to night, feeling blessed to have access to such teachings. My strength grew to abundance and I had been transformed.
     When armies were raised in resistance against Japan [1937], I followed Shen Honglie, chairman of my home province of Shandong, by serving in the army. Shen was a long-standing advocate for martial arts, so he made martial arts the major training regimen for the military, and since it is my hobby, I pursued this with extra sincerity. For fighting the enemy and smiting the invaders, it proved to be very helpful.
     When the communist bandits betrayed the nation [i.e. the communist takeover, meaning 1949], I went with the government in its relocation to Taiwan, where I have been serving as a schoolteacher in the Taizhong area. Since so many of those who get their schooling from me are young enthusiasts for martial arts, I have had no choice but to push myself and continue in my own training, receiving frequent guidance from my martial arts superior, Chen Panling, as well as constant encouragement from martial arts expert Wang Shujin and town council member Song Xianting. After a class, I contemplate and study, and whatever I am delving further into, be it Shaolin, Taiji, or weapons, if it conforms to the principles of health maintenance and the practicalities of self defense, I invariably write it all down into books.
     Of the internal arts, I have written Baduanjin, Assorted Health & Fitness Exercises, Taiji Boxing, and Taiji Sword. Of the external arts, I have written Basic Shaolin Boxing Movements in Thirty-Two Postures, Twelve-Line Tantui, Four-Line Cha Boxing, and Taizu Long Boxing. As for weapons, I have written of spear, saber, sword, and staff. What I have accumulated over a long period amounts to a compendium of information. Liu Wugui, a good friend, has done me the favor of making the photographs, and the book is now completed.
     Seeing as I live in Taiwan, I am limited as to available resources and have less access to books I ought to be consulting, and so for everything I have explained, I have only relied on my memory of what I was taught and what I have obtained through my own research, and so there are bound to be many errors and gaps. As to what I have been able to publish, mainly due to the nagging of friends and the requests of many colleagues, beyond Taiji Sword and Fitness Techniques on a Bed & Scientific Baduanjin, both of which have already been published and favorably received, I have now further submitted Assorted Health & Fitness Exercises, Basic Shaolin Boxing Movements in Thirty-Two Postures, Twelve-Line Tantui, and The Art of the Startling-Rainbow Sword. I sincerely hope that Chinese martial arts experts from around the world, gentlemen and countrymen all, will pick out flaws to be fixed, for if you would correct me where I have missed, I would feel fortunate indeed.
     – written by Yin Qianhe (Baiqia) of Shandong in Zhanghua, Taiwan, Aug 1, 1960 [This is the same preface, dated Oct, 1958, which appeared in his Taiji Sword and Baduanjin books, minimally updated.]

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - callig 1

尹千合先生
For Yin Qianhe:
強身強國
“Strengthening the self to strengthen the nation.”
于右任
– [calligraphy by] Yu Youren

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - callig 2

千合先生紀念
To commemorate this work by Yin Qianhe:
氣 精

力 神
“Spirit [精神] and strength [氣力] to the utmost [極]!”
蔣緯國敬題
– respectfully calligraphed by Jiang Weiguo

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - callig 3

千合先生紀念
To commemorate this work by Yin Qianhe:
發揚國粹
“Promoting the essence of our culture.”
高芳先
– [calligraphy by] Gao Fangxian

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - callig 4

千合先生國術叢書出刋紀念
To commemorate this work by Yin Qianhe:
鍛鍊身心
砥勵志節
“Exercise both body and mind.
Encourage both ambition and restraint.”
王一之敬題
– respectfully calligraphed by Wang Yizhi

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - portrait

著者肖像
Portrait of the author

四、國術總論
FOUR: GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE MARTIAL ARTS

國術為我國固有文化,學理高深,技術精妙,富有忠勇義俠精神,足以廉頑立懦,轉弱為强。世界各國運動,各有所長,允宜擇尤取法,惟以我國目前環境,欲節省經費、場地、時間、俾人人能練習而普及者,中國國術似較其他體育尤為便利。總統蔣公在育樂兩篇中昭示國人,國術:「中國的拳擊,不但是決鬪的方法,更有其體育意義,拳擊的最高境界,是心平氣和,意到力到,這種修養,是外國拳擊所不能企及的,我們叫它做國術……」簡明扼要,足資吾人警惕。
國術為我中華所獨有,純一之國粹,身心兼顧,伶俐活潑,身心得以健康,智慧因此提高,技擊通以妙用,道德趨於高尚,知覺敏銳,精神內固,强身益壽,自衛衛國,誠養身心之良法,强種族之國魂,為各國運動所不及,况國術不受經濟限制,不拘貧富,不論老幼,不拘時間,不分性別,不計場所,更不論個人或團體,均可隨時隨地練習,無論徒手拳術及器械、槍、刀、劍、棍等,均寓民族藝術,簡而易學,用之無窮,可謂惟一無二合乎大衆之實用體育,夫或謂:現已進入原子時代,何必多事徒勞?殊不知其强身自衛之價値,仍然存在,况古往今來,强國必先强種,强盛國家之民族,必然朝氣蓬勃,國民身健力强,有興旺之氣象,始達富强之域。
凡百事業之成功,無不賴乎體魄之强健,與夫意志之堅定,體魄愈强,意志愈堅,自能耐得勞苦,不畏艱難,國術不但是强身之樞機,奮鬪之動力,且能使頑夫聞之而起,懦夫聞之立志,易薄弱之身軀,成剛勁之體魄,變魯鈍之性情,為英挺之氣槪,願我同胞,振袂而起,共作聞鷄起舞,莫辭運甓之勞。效趙武靈王胡服騎射,驅盡萎靡之態,奮發精神,喚起國魂,待國家有用,以顯男兒身手,故余曰:「欲求全民健康,强族强種,非普及國術不為功。」
溯自我國國術,發明最早,遠自漢唐,攻城野戰,莫不藉國術出奇而致勝,相傳悠久,自有其歷史價値,然而迄今墮落不振者何耶?固由於武器發明,人之心理變遷,醉心西洋,風尚歐美,上不力倡,任其自生自滅所致,實則能國術者,多存有陋習,觀念窄狹,向重自身力行,甚且秘而不傳,傳而不澈底。更有不肖者,有暴粗狂妄之形態,江湖誇大之惡習,喜矜已之長,善道人之短,分門別派,互相仇視,中人以上遠避之而恐不暇,何肯虛心問業,此為國術不能振興普及之最大原因也。國術本無分少林武當,只要工夫純熟,無不柔中有剛,剛中有柔,變化莫測,應用裕如,後世以少林為外家,以武當為內家,又分花門紅門,南派北派,以門戶之見為褒貶之私,偶得一鱗半爪,自以為無尚眞諦,固步自封,抱殘守闕,同道相輕,互相柄鑿,於私無得,於國無補,良可慨嘆!顧彼東瀛人士學自我國技擊皮毛,稍加損益,而變成所謂今日之柔道,反能普及於世界,爭尚學習,不禁駭汗自愧。
在此反共抗俄大時代中,我國術界同人,應破除畛域,共同琢磨,統一目標,互相策勉,以闡揚國粹,丕振國威,携手研究,精益求精,一面妥定各級敎材,培養良好師資,以期敎法之改善,一面由軍旅而學校,由都市而鄕村,以期國術之普及,尤須身心兼修,達到領袖所示,心平氣和,意到力到之境界,使國術團體化、科學化、普遍化、道德化、成為救國救時之良藥,千合不敏,願執鞭以隨其後。
Martial arts are the traditional culture of our nation. Their principles are profound and their skills are exquisite. They are steeped in a spirit of loyalty and chivalry. They can open closed minds, bolster the timid, and strengthen the weak. Every nation in the world has its own brand of physical exercises, and they each have their good points, and we should admit that their way of doing such things is right for them. But for us in our current state of affairs, we want something that does not require money, special facilities, or specific scheduling, in order for people everywhere to be able to train. Chinese martial arts appear to be far more convenient than other types of physical education. President Chiang Kai-shek publicly declared this of Chinese martial arts in his writings on “Education and Recreation”: “China’s boxing arts are not merely fighting methods, they have even greater significance as physical education. The highest level in boxing arts is calm, harmonious, intent-directed power. The boxing arts of other nations have been unable to match this achievement, and so we call them our ‘national arts’.” This is brief, to the point, and all we need to rouse us.
     Chinese martial arts are singularly Chinese, our purest cultural essence, concerned with both body and mind, liveliness and cleverness. When your body and mind obtain health, your intelligence is enhanced, your skills become more subtle, and your moral sense tends to become more noble. Your awareness becomes more keen, your spirit becomes more sure of itself, your body is strengthened, your longevity is increased, and you are able to defend both self and nation. Truly these arts are an excellent means of nurturing body and mind, and serve the public good in strengthening the masses.
     There is an aspect of the physical exercises of other nations that makes them inferior: Chinese martial arts are not exclusive to those of a certain financial condition. It does not matter if you are rich or poor, young or old, busy or idle, man or woman, here or there, on your own on in a group. Anyone can practice, anytime and anywhere. Whether it be a boxing set or a weapon set such as spear, saber, sword, or staff, they are all imbued with our culture. They are simple and easy to learn, and are of limitless use. They can be said to be unparalleled for supplying practical physical education to the masses. Someone may say: “Now that we have entered the atomic age, why bother with these things anyway?” He really does not understand that they still have value in strengthening the body and defending the nation, indeed even more than they have throughout the ages, because to strengthen the nation, we must strengthen the people! And to strengthen the people, we must invigorate their vitality. When the people are healthy and strong, there is an atmosphere of prosperity, and then they are on the cusp of flourishing.
     Success in every undertaking always comes down to health and willpower. With a strong body and a resolute will, you will naturally be able to endure hard work and not be afraid of difficulty. Martial arts are not only essential in strengthening the body and are powerful in a fight, they can also get the closed-minded to become open, the timid to be become determined, change the weak in body into the strong of physique, and transform those of indifferent dispositions into heroic personalities. I hope my compatriots will dust off their sleeves and rise up, all of them hearing the call and being roused to action, none of them complaining of how much labor it will involve. It was very effective of King Wuling of Zhao to promote the wearing of military attire and the practice of horse-mounted archery. This drove away listlessness, replaced it with industriousness, and fired up the national spirit. He did not have to wait long for his kingdom to become capable and manifest manly skill. Therefore I say: “If we wish to bring health to the people and strength to the masses, this will not happen without the popularization of martial arts.”
     When we trace back, we find that our nation’s martial arts were the earliest to develop. As far back as the Han and Tang dynasties, sieges of cities and battles on open ground were all won through extraordinary martial skills. Seeing as it was valued in history for such a long time, why have these arts in modern days sunk so low? It is partially because since the invention of modern weaponry, the mentality of people has changed, and they have become infatuated with the West, the customs of Europe and America, of which I am not a fan but will allow to run their course. The real reason is because many of those with martial arts abilities are corrupt or have restrictive views, emphasizing personal practice to the extent that they keep their art secret instead of passing it down, and when they do teach it, they do not teach all of it. Even more unworthy are the ones who are violent, coarse, and arrogant, or the street entertainers with their absurd and distorted exhibitions, or those brag who love to brag about what they are good at but are no more expert at it than Daoist priests, or those who divide schools into styles which then hate each other. Ordinary people avoid these types, or say with polite apologies that they are too busy for them. After all, why would they ever be willing to ask such people for instruction? This is the biggest reason why Chinese martial arts have been unable to spread vigorously.
     Chinese martial arts do not really divide into Shaolin and Wudang, for the only thing of importance in either case is skill. In both schools, softness contains hardness and hardness contains softness, movements should transform unpredictably, and techniques are to be applied without effort. Succeeding generations classified Shaolin as the “external school” and Wudang as the “internal school”. Further distinctions were made, for instance Hua Style as being different from Hong Style, “southern branch” versus “northern branch”, etc. The various styles look upon each other with a sectarian bias, passing judgment over each other simply to promote their own ways. Whenever they encounter a piece of something from outside their niche, they instinctively decide it does not represent the “true essence”. Complacent and conservative, such people cherish their incomplete art, stubbornly defend their ignorance, share freely only with those within their own system, and mindlessly hammer at everyone else’s. They will not actually get anything out of this, nor will they help the nation – truly pathetic. When I consider the Japanese men who learned a smattering of our martial arts and slightly added to it, losing a bit of this and increasing a bit of that, until it had changed into what is known nowadays as Judo, and they have then able to popularize it throughout the world, which views their learning with awed admiration, I cannot help but break into a cold sweat, ashamed of us.
     This era is a crucial time of resistance against the communists and soviets. Please, my Chinese martial arts colleagues, put aside your differences so we may work together, united in purpose, encouraging each other. To promote our nation’s culture and rouse our nation’s prestige, let us engage in cooperative research to constantly improve these arts. One task is to produce teaching materials for all levels so as to foster better teachers and promote improved teaching methods. The other task is to take them everywhere, from barracks to schools, from cities to rural areas, promoting their spread of these arts. It is essential for body and mind to be mutually cultivated in order to reach the point in which teachers are displaying the condition of “calm, harmonious, intent-directed power”. By making Chinese martial arts organized, scientific, popular, and ethically influential, they will become a medicine to the save the nation and rescue the age. I am not a very bright person, but I hope to do my bit to at least whip this horse into a trot.

五、練國術之修養及應持態度
FIVE: MORAL ATTITUDES TO ADHERE TO IN MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING

國術之要旨,重道德不重暴力,尚義勇不尚私鬪,宜守不宜攻,需和不需燥,凡工夫愈深之人,愈心平氣和,待人接物循規蹈矩,謙恭有禮,此無他,涵養工夫深厚也,學國術為鍜鍊體魄,在使身體健美,如以此作爭强鬪狠之工具,則失其本旨矣。故余授徒,敎技藝不敎私鬪,鍊健康不鍊蠻力,重體育不重死功。
應以修養心性,培冶人格第一,技術勇力次之,倘心有偏差,存有邪念,兇暴粗頑,行為不正,再練技術,益助其惡,故立此武德修養八則為規範,自為守之,並約同學共守之,謹誌於後,以作參正。
The intention of martial arts is morality, not brutality. It esteems honor, not glory. It emphasizes defense, not attack. It demands harmoniousness, not mayhem. The deeper a person’s skill, the greater his calm. He will abide by rules in his treatment of others, behaving with humility and propriety, and for no other reason than that he has nourished his skill to a profound level. Learning martial arts to train your physique will make your body healthy. If you use it as a tool for competition and enmity, then you have mistaken its true purpose. Therefore when I instruct students, I teach them skills, but I do not teach them to fight for fame. I refine their health, not their savagery. I stress physical education, not deadliness of technique.
     You should cultivate your temperament, firstly developing your character and giving second priority to skill and courage. If you have a deviant mind full of wicked thoughts, callous and cruel, coarse and contrary, your behavior will be incorrect, and any training in such skills would only aid you in your evil. Thus I hold up these eight rules of martial virtue as a standard for you to personally abide by, and for you and your fellow students to uphold as a group. I have solemnly recorded them below so that you may refer to them and correct yourselves.

一、持之以莊:練國術須要莊重,即敦厚誠樸,不可輕窕,亦不可驕傲,孔子曰:「君子不重則不威,學則不固。」
1. Maintain seriousness:
     To practice martial arts, you must be serious, meaning sincere and humble rather than frivolous and arrogant. Confucius said [Lun Yu, 1.8]: “If a gentleman were not serious, he would not be taken seriously, nor would anything that he has learned stick with him.”

二、臨之以敬:與人交接要有恭敬心,「敬人者人恒敬之」,態度要謙恭誠懇,切忌阿諛賤態,尤忌傲慢自大。
2. Look upon others with respect:
     When in the company of others, you should be respectful. [It is said (Mengzi, 4b28):] “One who respects others is always respected.” Your manner should be polite, modest, and friendly, though not to the point of sycophancy, and you should never look down on others with a haughty self-importance.

三、接之以和:練國術人要心平氣和,切忌兇暴,逞强凌人,野蠻行為最可恥,待人接物,以和為主。
3. Receive others harmoniously:
     A martial artist should be even-tempered and harmonious. Avoid being violent, competitive, or insulting, for there can be nothing more disgraceful than to conduct yourself with cruelty. Harmoniousness is of prime importance in your treatment of others is.

四、秉之以公:練國術處事不可有私心,不要有偏見,做事要大公無私,光明壘落,應有慷慨正氣,不屈不撓之精神。
4. Maintain a sense of justice:
     To practice martial arts, you should in all matters be unselfish and unbiased, fair and impartial, open-minded and upright. Be generous, righteous, and incorruptible.

五、練之以勤:練國術要勤勞不輟,不可怠惰,語云:「業精於勤荒於戱」,滴水穿石,鐵杵磨針,勤練自然工夫深。
5. Practice with diligence:
     To practice martial arts, you have to work at it industriously and unceasingly. You must not be lazy. It is said [by Han Yu, “About the Civil Service Examinations”]: “Mastery lies in hard work, whereas fooling around will amount to nothing, [and success lies in focus, whereas just doing whatever you feel like will make it all fall apart].” Just as dripping water will eventually bore through a stone or the pounding of iron will eventually produce a needle, with diligent practice your skill will naturally deepen.

六、行之以義:練國術要有忠勇義俠精神,語云:「見義不為無勇也,行而宜之之謂義」,就是應該做的才做,不應該做的,切莫亂為。
6. Conduct yourself with honor:
     To practice martial arts, you should have a mentality of loyalty and chivalry. It is said [by Confucius, Lun Yu, 2.25]: “To be aware of what is right and not do it is cowardly.” [And it is also said, by Han Yu, “The Original Way” (meaning Confucianism):] “To behave as you ought to behave is called honor.” This means doing what should do and never arbitrarily giving in to doing what you should not.

七、存之以仁:語云:「仁者無敵」練國術以仁愛為本,仁民愛物,融容大度,存心善良,應有博愛精神。
7. Cherish compassion:
     It is said [Mengzi, 1a5]: “The compassionate have no enemies.” To practice martial arts, base yourself in compassion and humaneness. [It is also said (Mengzi, 7a45):] “[A gentleman is] compassionate toward others and humane toward animals.” Be mild, magnanimous, and kindhearted. You should have a mentality of universal love.

八、歸之以忠:練國術人切戒私鬪,逞强私鬪最為可恥,應以技術身心獻於國家民族。
8. Give yourself with loyalty:
     A martial artist resolutely avoids getting into fights to prove himself. If you fight with others simply to flaunt your own superiority, you should be utterly ashamed of yourself, for you should instead be contributing your skill, body, and mind to your nation and your people!

六、練國術四要
SIX: FOUR REQUIREMENTS FOR PRACTICING MARTIAL ARTS

一、要循規漸進,練拳不可心急,須漸漸進展,凡未經練習國術之人,或已練過而輟棄太久者,其週身脈絡筋骨,均不靈活,倘遽而用力過猛,或一次練習時間太多,則筋骨脈絡有張弛之痛苦,故宜聽從老師指導,循規漸進為宜。
1. You should train properly and progress gradually. In practicing boxing, you must not be impatient but must instead let progress gradually unfold. It is generally the case for one who has never practiced, or for one who has not practiced in a long time, that his whole body, its channels and vessels, sinews and bones, will not be nimble. If he is hasty and exerts himself too aggressively, or practices too much in one session, then his sinews and bones, channels and vessels, will be strained to the point of pain. Therefore it is best to listen to your teacher’s guidance and train properly, progress gradually.

二、要有恒心,語云:「有恒為成功之本」,不可中途停輟,無論做何事,皆須有恒,而練國術更為重要,古語云:「字要習,馬要騎,胡琴要勤拉,拳脚要踢打,」又云:「拳不離手,曲不離口」,天天練習,時久自成,可獲畢生之益。
2. You should be perseverant. There is a saying: “Perseverance is the basis of success.” You must not go only halfway and then quit. No matter what your project is, in all cases you must have perseverance, and in martial arts it is even more important. There is an old saying: “Characters should be written, horses should be ridden, fiddles should be played, and fists and feet should punch and kick.” There is another saying: “Boxing will never go away from [a boxer’s] hands. Singing will never go away from [a singer’s] mouth.” With daily practice over a long period, you will naturally succeed, and you will be able to obtain its benefits for your whole life.

三、要心平氣和,學國術要靜氣凝神,涵養謹厚,不可狂妄作態,以免受社會人士輕視,而影響國術之普及。
3. Your mind should be calm and your emotions should be in harmony. When learning martial arts, you should quiet your emotions and concentrate your spirit, as well as restrain yourself and be very careful toward others. You must not have an arrogant manner. You will thereby avoid being despised by others in society and you will help influence the spread of martial arts.

四、要尊師重道,敬業樂群,所謂技也近乎道,要尊敬師長,同道合作,養成義俠正氣,救弱扶傾之精神,與捍衛國家之大志。
4. You should respect the teacher and take his method seriously, and also respect the work and take delight in your fellows. It is therefore said that “skill approaches the Way”. The teacher should be respected, because it is by way of like-mindedness that we work together. To cultivate a spirit of justice and righteousness, of rescuing the weak and bolstering the weary, and to defend our nation, are the major aims.

七、練國術應注意事項
SEVEN: THINGS TO PAY ATTENTION TO WHEN PRACTICING MARTIAL ARTS

一、練國術者不可吃酒,吃酒不可醉,狂飲傷血,醉後切莫練,尤節色慾,貪色傷精,更戒暴躁,憤怒傷氣。
1. When you practice martial arts, you must not drink alcohol, or if you do, you must not get drunk. Drinking excessively will injure your blood. After getting drunk, by no means are you to practice. Restrain your lust, which would damage your essence. Abstain from anger, which would injure your energy.

二、餓腹不可練,練後益飢,過飢損腸胃,吃飽不可練,胃滿腸充,練則傷腸胃。
2. You must not practice when you are hungry. By the time you finish practicing, you will be starving. Excessive hunger will weaken your digestive organs. You also must not practice when you are full. While your stomach is filled and your intestines are filling, practice would injure your digestive organs.

三、四季皆可練,尤重夏之三伏,冬之三九,在吃飯前半小時一定休息,俟心平氣和再吃飯,飯後須休息一小時始可練,俟腸胃稍鬆,練習較宜。
3. You can practice during all four seasons, and it is particularly important to do so in the hottest days of summer and the coldest days of winter. A half hour before eating a meal, you should take a rest from practicing, waiting for your mind to become calm and your energy to become harmonious, then you may eat. After eating, you must rest for an hour, then you can begin to practice again. By waiting for your digestive organs to feel slightly looser, practice will be more appropriate.

四、練功時宜穿著便鞋及便褲,比較寬舒便利,穿四式褲,襠裌過窄,易於破裂,皮鞋過硬,多不舒適。
4. When practicing, you should wear casual shoes and casual pants, which are more comfortable and convenient. If you wear formal pants, the crotch lining will be too narrow and may easily split. Dress shoes are too hard and are typically uncomfortable.

五、練功時雖在夏天,宜著便褲襯衣,最少要穿背心,否則赤膀露背,有失雅觀。
5. When practicing even during those summer days, you should also wear a casual shirt. But put on at the very least a tank top, otherwise your naked arms plus your exposed back will just make you look uncouth.

六、練功以早上為佳,不可間斷,不可練而不謹,亦不可練之過勞,應視體力而定,初練或感身體酸痛,疲憊不堪,不必憂慮,那是在換力氣,休息以後,便增加新力量,要堅持信心,語云:「滴水穿石,鐵杼磨針。」功到自然成,學者應三復斯言。
6. It is best to practice in the morning. You must not allow interruptions. You must not practice without paying attention to what you are doing. You also must not practice to the point of exhaustion. You should consider your own physique and be balanced toward it. In the beginning of the training, you will sometimes feel your body is aching or that you are unbearably weary. You do not need to worry, this is just the process of effort, which after resting will easily generate increased strength. Stay confident in it. A saying goes: “Dripping water will eventually bore through a stone. The pounding of iron will eventually produce a needle.” Hard work will naturally succeed. You should think upon these words repeatedly.

八、劍術槪論
EIGHT: GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO THE SWORD ART

一、劍之起源:劍,古兵器名,上古人與獸爭,多以此為戰鬪之具,以木製之,或以石製之,粗具其形而已。自葛天盧之山,洪水發而出金,蚩尤受而制之為劍鎧,(見管子地數篇),於是始有劍之名,而未言其製,至考工記詳之曰劍,兩刄而有脊,自脊至刄為之臘,或有謂之鍔,脊刄以下與柄分隔者為之首,首以下把握之處曰莖,莖端施環曰譚,(見考工記)與近世之劍甚異,此後子史之言劍者甚多,而皆未詳其製造,如文王之錄,太公之闕,桓公之葱,莊君之昒,闔閭之干將莫邪,皆古之寳劍也(見荀子)相傳昔歐冶鑄劍,赤堇之山破而出錫,若耶之溪涸而出銅,是時天地為爐,陰陽為炭,太乙下觀,鑄劍有五,一、曰湛盧,二、曰純剛,三、曰勝邪,四、曰魚腸,五、曰巨闕是也。殷帝有寳劍三。一、曰含光,二、曰承影,三、曰宵練。此三劍相傳十三世,後楚王亦有寳劍三,曰龍淵,曰太阿,曰工布是也,勾踐有劍八,曰掩日、斷水、轉魄、懸剪、驚鯢、滅魂、郤邪、眞剛是也,吳帝之劍六,曰白虹、紫電、辟邪、流星、靑冥、百里是也,(見崔豹古今註)均誌其名,未詳其製,至周昭王之五劍,梁武帝之十三劍,(見陶宏景刀劍錄),其名未得詳傳,至劍式尺度及製造率皆不同,如秦始皇之劍八尺,荊軻之劍八寸,高祖之劍三尺,(見史記)魏太子丕之劍四尺二寸,此四人同時或前後相距歷時不遠,而所用之劍長短各異,昔姜君元吉在甘肅見女子以丈餘彩帛,用數寸利刄繫兩端,双手持舞快如流星,問以何名,答曰劍器(見札樸)此又劍之別式,據此,是以古劍之製,難考證也,茲就今世之合用者而研究之,以求其適用而已。
1. Sword Origins:
     A “sword” is an ancient weapon, used by ancient people for fighting off wild animals and often a tool of combat. They were made of wood or stone, and were rough-surfaced. Then “there was flooding in the Ge Lu mountains that brought forth metal, and Chi You received it and worked it to make swords, armor, spears, and halberds.” (see Guanzi, chapter 77) Thereupon would begin the recording of sword names, but not yet any description of their actual manufacture.
     The details of the sword from the “Record of Artisans” [in the Rites of Zhou] are: “It has two edges and a spine. From the spine to the edge is called ‘the sacrificer’, or ‘the blade’. The divider between blade and handle is called ‘the hilt’. The handle itself is called ‘the stalk’. At the end of the stalk is a ring called ‘the pommel’.” (see the “Record of Artisans” [although the quote is actually from Essentials of the Wudang Sword Art, 1931]) Modern swords are very different from this.
     Historians henceforth named a great many swords, but were not yet discussing how they were made, for instance: “There was King Wen’s Lu, Grand Duke Jiang’s Que, Duke Huan’s Cong, Prince Zhuang’s Hu, and King Helu’s Gan Jiang and Mo Ye. These were all superb ancient swords.” (see Xunzi [chapter 23])
     “Tradition has it that Ou Ye made swords. At a mountain in Chidong, there was an avalanche and tin was exposed, and a stream in Ruoye dried up and copper was exposed. With the sky and earth as a furnace, and the passive and active energies as the coal, and with Nature to oversee the process, he made five swords, called Deep River, Pure Hook, Conquering Evil, Fish Guts, and Big Watchtower. The Emperor of Yin had three swords: Containing Light, Granting Reflection, and Night Practice. These three swords were passed down for thirteen generations. Later, the King of Chu had three precious swords: Dragon Well, Tai’e, and Declarer of Work. King Goujian of Yue had eight swords: Sun Hider, Divider of Waters, Changer of Minds, Hanging Scissors [perhaps the same idea as a Sword of Damocles], Frightening Lizard, Drainer of Souls, Splitter of Evil, and Truly Indomitable. The Emperor of Wu had six swords: White Snake, Purple Lightning, Preventer of Evil, Shooting Star, Glittering Night, and Hundred Miles.” (see Cui Bao’s Ancient & Modern Records)
     These records named swords, but no making of swords was described until the mention of the five swords of King Zhao of Zhou and the thirteen swords of Emperor Wu of Liang (see Tao Hongjing’s List of Swords & Sabers), which ironically did not record the names of the swords. The shape, length, and manufacturing process for swords tended to vary. The Qin Emperor’s sword was eight feet long, Jing Ke’s sword was eight inches long, Emperor Gaozu’s sword was three feet long (according to Sima Qian’s Historical Records), and Prince Cao Pi of Wei’s sword was four feet and two inches long. These four men lived at more or less the same time and yet they used swords of differing length.
     “Long ago, Prince Jiang of Yuan while visiting Gansu saw a woman with a ten-foot silk streamer cut it lengthwise into two pieces and then, with one in each hand, dance with them as quick as shooting stars. He asked her what this was called and she told him ‘swordware’.” (see Writings on Simplicity) This also shows the varying forms the “sword” can take. Going by such records, how ancient swords were made is difficult to verify, but there are those nowadays who are conducting the appropriate research to seek out the right answers.

二、古劍奇跡:古之兵器雖繁,但人多尊劍,且稱之為寳劍,歷觀諸子百家群記雜錄,無奇不有,多有記述,旣有是說,不能盡屬揑造,如錕鋙之鍊鋼,可以切玉(見列子)魚腸之砥礪可以刺犀,(見淮南子)周昭鑄以鎭五嶽,梁武造以治四方,(見陶宏景劍錄)或斷馬擊鵠,或比夕秋月,或四時而變五色,或躍平津而化雙龍,或如楚而知霸業,(見吳越春秋)或斬猊而驚小醜,擊衣殷血,斬形成疾,(見引國豫讓傳)巖巖如燐石,煥煥如晶氷,鱗鋏星鐔,有時而吼,聲出地中,耕牛皆驚,穿銅絕鐵,決如粢米,(見越絕書)伏地藏函,氣冲斗牛,(晋見書張華傳)赴榛薄而折兕豹,趨深淵而斷蛟龍,或有兵則飛起而指其方,或在室而光景猶照於外,(見王嘉拾遺記)晝見影而不見光,夜見光而不見影,載籍流傳不勝枚擧,夫中華之大,立國之久,眞所謂無奇不有,縱未必其事皆眞,而寳劍之稱,槪多由於此。且古人造劍之專,誠心之至,累月積歲,親手琢磨,或得天光地氣之助,逈非他器可比,非若後世故弄虛玄劍仙傳說之謂也。古時工業尚未發達,無機械之利,今之工業大興,機械奧妙,已達極點,雖精心研究,不惜工料,而所製之劍與古劍較,遠不如古劍,如今日之刺繡、陶器、雕刻等藝,率皆古盛今衰,鑄劍其一也。蓋古劍之鑄,全賴人工眞精神,非借重他力而成,且每逢造劍必有造劍之目的與至尚之精血凝聚。語云:「精誠所至,金石為開,」故與簡略機械製造者,不可同日而語也。
2. Sword Fables:
     There were numerous ancient weapons, but people most revered swords. They even referred to them as “precious swords”. For the history of swords, we look to the various ancient schools of thought, who recorded many miscellaneous things, every strange thing there was, and who made note of and reference to many swords, with no limit to the stories they came up with. There was the tempered steel of Kunwu which could slice through jade (see Liezi), or the tempered steel of Fish Guts which stab through rhino hide (see Huainanzi), or the swords made by order of King Zhao of Zhou with which he conquered the land, or those made by order of Emperor Wu of Liang with which he controlled the kingdom (see Tao Hongjing’s List of Swords).
     “Halting their horses and striking at their targets, then seeming like the autumn moon at its brightest, then changing the four seasons into the five colors, then leaping over the ferry crossing to transform the twin dragons, like the kingdom of Chu once aware of what the tyrant has done.” (see the Annals of Wu and Yue)
     “Slaughtering wild beasts and frightening away thieves, stabbing at their clothes producing dark blood, slashing at them to make them suffer.” (see “Bio of Yu Rang”)
     “Majestic as gemstones it was, shining like ice crystals in its fish-scale scabbard and gleaming pommel. Then there was a roar, a sound from within the ground, that frightened all the plowing oxen, as copper was pierced through by steel as though it was but swishing through grain.” (see Further Books of Yue)
     “Crouching concealed on the ground, with energy rushing up to the stars.” (see Books of Jin, “Bio of Zhang Hua”)
     “It goes into the forest to overcome the rhino and the panther. It hastens into the depths to stop the flood dragon. When with the army, it flies forth and points their way ahead. When in a room, its gleam still seems to shine outside.” (see Wang Jia’s Collected Lost Records)
     During the daytime, we see shadow but do not notice light. During the night, we see light but do not notice shadow. Too many books have been handed down to enumerate, especially considering the size of China and the age of the nation, and they indeed cover “every strange thing”, not that they are necessarily all true things, certainly not in the case of the “precious swords”.
     The focus with which ancient people made swords was wholehearted, completely sincere, spending months or years working on them by hand, aided only by the sunshine and climate, and yet no other swords can compare to them, not even the magic swords in fiction that modern readers amuse themselves with. In ancient times, industry had not yet developed and there was no machine-given convenience. Today, industry flourishes, equipped with machines that are profoundly efficient and extremely precise. But despite meticulous research and unstinting labor, today’s machine-made swords are vastly inferior to ancient swords. Nowadays the arts of embroidery, pottery, and engraving are all feeble next to the magnificence of the ancient artisans, and the same is true for the casting of swords. Ancient sword casting depended entirely on how much personal spirit was put into the work rather than relying on help from others, and whenever swords were made, it was essential to have the purposed goal of making swords and to highly value the hard work and concentration that would be involved. A saying goes: “The purest sincerity can break through metal and rock.” Things that are produced with such ease nowadays by machines do not even deserve to be part of the same conversation.

三、劍之功業:器必特利而人貴之,功必異常而衆稱之,昔曹沫持劍刼桓公而魯不辱,毛遂持劍叱楚子而趙以尊,專諸利透重甲吳王易位,馮煖彈長鋏而驚感孟嘗,高祖提三尺劍而漢室興基,祖逖聞雞起舞,以衛晋土,或大阿麾而三軍靡,或鐵石砍而萬歲呼,此莫不仗劍以成事,而人之功業亦劍之功業也。吾夫子至聖也,且時佩劍週旋於壇坫之間,韓信體弱,佩劍壯膽,卒揮軍敗霸王於垓下。子路見孔子亦雄冠佩劍,以示本色,季札掛劍以守信義,迨於漢制自天子至百官多佩劍,佩劍者非所以利殺人,乃用以防害也。如日本有傳國寳三種,劍居其一,其所以寳貴者,當立國時,建有莫大之功業,故歷代尊重劍者為多,古時兵器不少,而文人武士喜佩劍,其善劍者,甚而稱仙,且其他器械演習,則曰練、曰耍、曰操,惟於劍則稱之曰舞,蓋因劍歷代之功業昭著,乃自然尊重而高尚者也。
3. Sword Achievements:
     The weapon has to be effective for someone to value it. The achievement has to be unusual for everyone to talk about it. Long ago, Cao Mo grasped his sword and compelled Duke Huan into compliance, preventing the state of Lu from being humiliated. Mao Sui held up his sword and rebuked the King of Chu into an alliance with the kingdom of Zhao. Concentrated sharpness penetrating through heavy armor is what dethroned the King of Wu. Feng Xuan snapped his sword to its length, deeply impressing Prince Mengchang. Emperor Gaozu lifted his three-foot sword and gave the House of Liu its foundation. Zu Ti defended his kingdom of Jin by getting up to practice every morning as soon as the rooster started calling. Tai’e was brandished and three armies perished. Iron Stone cleaved through and “long life to the ruler” was proclaimed. These are all examples of success by way of reliance on the sword. Human achievement is the sword’s achievement.
     Confucius was a sage, but he wore a sword at his waist when at a ruler’s oath-taking ceremony. Han was considered weak, but he became bold once he had a sword at his side, and thus he led an army to defeat a tyrant while still at the frontier. When Zilu went to visit Confucius, he too was armed with a sword at his waist to demonstrate his true mettle. Li Zha hung up his sword to keep his promise. By the Han era, the sword was worn at the waist by everyone, from the Emperor to every official. The sword worn at the waist is not for killing people, it is for preventing trouble. This is like when the Japanese expressed the power of the state in three forms, the first of them was the sword, for it is so highly regarded. The founding of a nation is the greatest achievement of all, and that is why the sword has been so valued throughout history.
     There were many kinds of weapons in ancient times, but both scholars and warriors liked to wear swords at their waist. Sword masters are often referred to as “immortals”. Furthermore, when doing exercises with other weapons, it is simply termed “to practice”, “to play”, or “to drill”, whereas with the sword it can be called “to dance”. Due to the obvious achievements of the sword throughout history, it is natural for the sword to be so highly esteemed.

四、劍之効能:劍術中有六合,即心與意合,意與氣合,氣與力合,是內三合,眼與劍合,劍與步合,步與力合,是外三合,全身靈活,貫串一氣,集中發出,即為劍之活力,任自然之理,運用姿勢,効力顯然,變化萬端,約而言之,大槪有二十字,曰刺、曰劈、曰砍、曰撩、曰挑、曰剒、曰摸、曰拋、曰攔、曰掛、曰衝、曰絞、曰抽、曰弸、曰削、曰托、曰雲、曰抄、曰鑽、曰切、是也。比太極劍効能多四個字。
一、劍鋒直向前方為之刺,二、劍身以刄下擊為之砍,三、劍身由左右斜向下為之劈,四、正手腕劍鋒及劍身由下向上為之挑,五、反手腕劍鋒及刄向上為之撩,六、劍身刄向前後鋸割為之剒,七、劍身平橫為之摸,八、劍身向左右平行為之拋,(亦為之掃)九、劍鋒由下向上為之衝,十、劍身橫截為之攔,十一、劍鋒向下垂為之掛,十二、劍身上橫為之托,十三、劍鋒向左右擺動為之絞,十四、刺出即收為之抽,十五、劍鋒半割為之削,十六、手按劍柄劍鋒上躍為之弸,十七、劍鋒左右廻環為之雲,十八、順勢格撥敵器為之抄,劍鋒擰刺為之鑽,平劍身以刄下按謂之切。以上劍之効力,不過略釋,每字之中尚有若干動,在各式中另有說明,至精於劍術者,並非神仙之助,必求之人工磨練,堅毅精神而成,閃轉進退升降,効能姿勢運用,每動分淸,熟中生巧,運用變化存乎一心,今日練劍以藝術為主,蓋藉藝術以提高練習興趣,而促身體健康,與夫古人習劍,志在應用者,因時代之不同而目的迥異,學者善留意矣,習之日久,自有不可思議之妙境生焉。
4. Sword Techniques:
     Within the sword art, there are six “unions”: the three internal unions of mind united with intention, intention united with energy, and energy united with power, combined with the three external unions of eye united with sword, sword united with step, and step united with power. Your whole body is nimble, energy coursing through and expressing in focused concentration. The vitality of swordwork accords with natural principles. In movement and posture, the efficacy of the sword is obvious and its adaptability is limitless. Generally speaking, there are about twenty techniques: stabbing, chopping, cleaving, raising, carrying, filing, wiping, flinging, blocking, hanging, thrusting, twining, drawing, flicking, paring, propping, clouding, scooping, drilling, and slicing. Compared to the same list in my Taiji Sword book, there are four more terms in this one [the four added here being drawing, scooping, drilling, slicing].
     1. Stabbing – the sword tip goes directly forward.
     2. Cleaving – the outer edge of the sword body attacks straight downward.
     3. Chopping – the sword body attacks diagonally downward from left or right.
     4. Carrying – hold your wrist upright and bring the sword tip and inner edge upward from below.
     5. Raising – turn over your wrist and bring the sword tip and outer edge upward.
     6. Filing – the outer edge of the sword body saws back and forth.
     7. Wiping – the sword body goes across held horizontally.
     8. Flinging – the sword body moves across to either side. (This is also called sweeping.)
     9. Thrusting – the sword tip goes upward from below.
     10. Blocking – the sword body goes across to intercept.
     11. Hanging – the sword tip hangs down.
     12. Propping – the sword body goes upward held horizontally.
     13. Twining – the sword tip waves side to side.
     14. Drawing – the sword is gathered in after stabbing.
     15. Paring – the sword tip does a half cut.
     16. Flicking – the sword handle is pushed down to make the tip jump up.
     17. Clouding – the sword tip circles to the left and right.
     18. Scooping – the sword goes along with the momentum to deflect the opponent’s weapon.
      [19] Drilling – the sword tip twists while stabbing.
      [20] Slicing – the sword body while level uses the outer edge to push down.
     These are but the briefest descriptions of these techniques. There are still more movements within each technique, as well as further explanations of them within the postures of the set.
     An expert at the sword art does not really have any magic to assist him, and he had to make it happen through hard work and willpower, through all the twisting and turning, advancing and retreating, rising and lowering, through every technique, posture, and movement. Keeping the movements precise, you will become skillful with practice, changing from one to another with constant focus. Nowadays, the priority in sword training is artistry, which is emphasized to make the practice more interesting and to better promote health. When ancient people trained with a sword, the goal was function. Times changes, so goals differ. Be mindful, and then after practicing it over a long period you will naturally find yourself in a state of unimaginable joy.

九、舞劍訣要
NINE: SECRETS OF SWORD PRACTICE

劍術一道,為吾中華歷史上最高尚之技術,以其技擊高尚,多知其然,而不知其所以然,遂以訛傳訛,演變成神秘,間有一二懷絕技者,目之為仙,又或珍惜不肯傳人,更乏著述以憑參考,因而劍術精華,幾成絕學,國粹至寳,不得流傳,至為可惜,余自習國術以來,窃喜劍術,欲探尋此高尚藝術之奧義,然二十年來戎馬生活,參加抗戰戡亂,終未賞所願,來臺十載,生活安定,於敎課之餘,擬將中華國術,作有系統之著述,去歲曾出太極劍及牀上健身術與科學八段錦二書,蒙社會人士及同道愛護,茲再提出「驚虹劍術」一書,就敎於國人。
練習舞劍,以細心推想,盡情揣摩為要,劍之有術如琴之有曲,要氣注於丹田,神注於鋒鍔,轉折上下,疾徐有節,揮舞頓挫,變化無窮,思古人之習劍,一式有一式來歷,一劍有一劍用處,劍放而能收,劍收亦能放,每式要凝神定氣,手足相應,意前劍後,心靈手敏,要眼快、劍快、步快、神到意到、力到,所謂劍及履及,緊密無隙,審勢全賴機靈,進退不失其宜,當進則進,迅雷不及掩耳,當退則退,瞬息不可逗遛,無論砍、撩、劈、刺,無不如法,旋轉上下,全神貫注,或左或右,圓轉自如,或前或後,輕捷靈便,心氣相通,緊密無痕,有龍飛鳳舞之精神,虎蹲猿躍之姿態,迂廻波折,起伏靈活,動靜處,不可拖泥帶水,出勢時,切忌猶豫板滯。
騰起閃躍,左旋右轉,潛如游魚,行如飛鳥,疾似追風,動似閃電,正花反花,兩面相依,見機景生,蹈空抵隙,一步連一步,一劍趕一劍,乘虛取巧以觀變,欲揚必抑以察機,不能遲滯半步,不能妄廢半劍,須細察往還之劍,尤注意升降之勢,劍迅出而風勢相隨,步急進而全神貫注,能長能短,有虛有實,龍行虎步,變勢換形,靜如處子,動如脫兎,進退適度,恰合竅訣,眼觀上中下三路,神注左右前後四方,收放虛實,變化萬千,其中奧妙,實難以筆墨形容之。
劍術一開一展,運臂搖腕,內有縱橫出奇之妙,中藏鬼神莫測之機,懸空伏地,奔騰起落,旋轉翻身如驟雨之將至,跳躍廻環,大有迅雷不及掩耳之慨,劍術變化莫測,非他藝可比,習劍旣久,力運周身而氣隨之,血脈暢通,呼吸深透,故舞劍可養活然之氣,每讀史書,凡好劍者,大都光明壘落,肝膽照人,是以學舞劍能變化氣質,學者細心揣摩,精益求精,專力致功,熟中生巧,自可得其奧義矣。
The sword art is the most highly esteemed skill in our nation’s history. What makes this particular martial skill so admired is that so many have known about it but have not really understand it, and they then piled exaggeration on top of exaggeration until it has developed a mystique. The few who possessed consummate skill were seen as otherworldly and they were often unwilling to teach it to others. Furthermore, there is a palpable lack of writings about it for us to consult. Consequently, the essence of the sword art has been mostly lost, rendering the most valuable treasure in our culture incapable of being passed down, truly a pity.
     In my personal practice of martial arts, I have especially delighted in the sword art. I wanted to delve into this noble art and discover its subtleties, but then I spent twenty [twelve] years living as a war horse, participating in both the fight against the Japanese and the fight against the communist rebels, and I had no chance through that time to fulfill my wish. Since coming to Taiwan ten years ago, life has been stable, and in my free time after teaching schoolchildren, I have been working to present Chinese martial arts through systematic writings. Last year I published two books, Taiji Sword and Fitness Techniques on a Bed & Scientific Baduanjin, for the like-minded in society to treasure, and now I am putting forward The Art of the Startling-Rainbow Sword to give further instruction to my countrymen.
     When practicing the sword, you should be meticulous and thoughtful, wholeheartedly pondering what you are doing. The sword has techniques in the same way the zither has songs. Energy should be concentrated in your elixir field and spirit should be concentrated at the sword tip. In twisting and turning, going up and down, there is a rhythm of fast and slow with punctuated transitions and endless transformations. If we consider how the ancients practiced the sword, each posture had its own background and each technique had its specific function.
     The sword shoots out able to be withdrawn, then withdraws able to shoot out again. In every posture, you should concentrate your spirit and stabilize your energy. Your hands and feet should coordinate with each other. Your intention goes forth and the sword follows. Your mind should be nimble and your hand should be dexterous. Your eyes should be quick, your sword should be quick, and your steps should be quick. Spirit arrives, then intent arrives, then power arrives. Sword and step arrive together with not even the smallest gap in coordination. Your perception of a situation entirely depends on your intelligence. In advancing and retreating, never miss the right moment. When it is time to advance, come on like the thunder, too sudden to cover one’s ears. When it is time to retreat, retreat like the disappearance of the lightning flash, too sudden for there to be anything left of it to see.
     Whether cleaving, raising, chopping, or stabbing, do them always according to correct standards. Whether spinning around, or going up or down, put your whole spirit into it. Whether turning to the left or right, do so with total ease. Whether going forward or back, be nimble and agile. Mind and energy should link together so there is not the slightest disconnection between them. Have the spirit of a flying dragon or a dancing phoenix and the posture of a crouching tiger or a leaping monkey. Twist and turn unpredictably. Rise up and crouch down nimbly. When you move, you must not be disorganized. When you act, you must not hesitate. Suddenly rise, suddenly leap. Spin away to the left, to the right. Dive like a fish and fly like a bird. Move as fast as the chasing wind, sudden as a lightning bolt. Do circular flourishes downward and upward, both aspects depending on each other. When the view to an opportunity becomes clear, step into an empty space and put pressure into a gap. Each step continues into another step and each technique is followed by another technique.
     To take advantage of gaps and seize the chance skillfully, observe how the opponent adapts. If he wants to rise up, he must first press down, so watch for that cue. You must not commit the delaying action of stepping only halfway or the wasted action of a half-expressed sword technique. You must analyze the comings and goings of his sword, paying special attention to the rising and lowering of his posture. If his sword comes out fast, respond like the wind, and if his step advances rapidly, meet him with your entire spirit.
     Be capable with both long techniques and short ones, feinting techniques and real ones, with dragon movements and tiger steps, the techniques alternating and the shapes switching. “Begin guardedly like a shy girl [until he opens his gates,] then invade like a rabbit diving into one of its bolt-holes.” [Art of War, chapter 11] Advancing and retreating to the appropriate degree, choose the right tricks for the right moment. Your eyes see everything – above, middle, below – and your spirit reaches everywhere – left, right, front, back. In gathering and releasing, emptying and filling, the transformations are limitless. Such subtleties are truly difficult to describe in words.
     With each spreading and extending of a technique, there is a wielding of your arm and trembling at your wrist. Within the techniques is the marvel of things that are extraordinary to behold yet effortlessly performed. Hidden inside are operations that even supernatural beings could not detect. Seem to hang for a moment in the air, then crouch on the ground. Spring forward, rising and lowering. Spin your body like the onset of a sudden storm, leaping and whirling with the suddenness of a thunderclap. The sword art is one of changing unpredictably.
     Other arts just do not compare. When you practice the sword for a long time, strength fills your whole body, your energy becomes smooth, your blood circulates unimpeded, and your breath deepens, thus sword practice nourishes the life force. We find in historical texts that lovers of the sword art are typically portrayed as people who are guileless, upright, and courageous. Therefore learning a sword set can transform your temperament. Be scrutinizing and perfectionistic. Put all your effort into it, for skill will come from hard work, and you will then naturally be able to obtain its subtleties.

十、劍歌二首
TEN: A COUPLE OF SWORD SONGS

歌一
SONG ONE

劍出帶風進,全身靈手捷,馬步足運力,藏精入丹田。
藝熟技自精,劍力透中鋒,弓步勁貫腕,抽劍嚥精津。
心神相會合,手足運莫停,前手疾似箭,後手貫如弓。
密似鳥啄米,急如夜流星,身柔蓄有勁,體重含有輕。
勢如猿猴躍,威似虎豹蹲,橫掃魔窟裡,千軍難逃生。
When your sword comes out, it draws forth the wind.
Your whole body is nimble, your hands dexterous.
The feet of your horse-riding stance move with strength.
Energy is stored within your elixir field.
     Expertise will come naturally through experience.
The force of your sword penetrates to the tip.
The power of your bow stance courses through to your wrist.
Draw back the sword as if swallowing down saliva.
     Mind and spirit merge with each other.
Hands and feet move without pause.
The front hand is fast as an arrow,
and the rear hand aims like a bow.
     Be meticulous as a bird pecking grains,
fast as a shooting star at night.
Your body’s suppleness stores power.
Your body’s heaviness contains lightness.
     The movement is like a monkey leaping.
The attitude is like a tiger crouching.
You are sweeping all aside within a den of monsters,
and even a whole army cannot escape.

歌二
SONG TWO

自古神奇劍術多,正史鮮載野史訛,去浮求眞無史料;若絞腦汁暗摸索。
架上雲雀無影落,巢中飛鳥別枝托。林中驚鸞冲霄漢;龍飛鳳舞遮天河,
練膽固氣奮全力。縱橫抽刺勢靈活,登山越澗皆通用;欲求精微細揣摩。
There have been many mystical sword arts since ancient times,
recorded too rarely in official histories, often exaggerated in unofficial histories.
When we go in search of the real stuff, there are essentially no historical documents for us,
and we seem left with racking our brains and groping about so much in the dark
that perching skylarks are leaving no shadow,
nesting birds are flying to the wrong branches,
and all the fabulous birds of the forest are surging up lost in the sky,
for the “flying dragons” and “dancing phoenixes” have blotted out even the stars!
All we can do is practice audaciously, with a steadfast energy and a wholehearted devotion,
crissing and crossing, drawing in and stabbing out with great agility.
Techniques such as “climbing the mountain” or “crossing the stream” are common enough,
but if you wish to seek the profound essence, you must scrutinize and ponder.

十一、學劍數記
ELEVEN: A FEW POINTERS FOR LEARNING THE SWORD

一、初學劍者,最好先用竹子或木料製造假劍,俟身法步法手法,略有門徑,再換用鋼鐵所鑄眞劍,初學時身體手足,皆不如法,諸感不適,似覺痛苦,要堅毅忍耐,漸漸如法,即可舒暢,而進入愉快之境。
1. In the beginning of learning the sword, it is best to start with one made of bamboo or wood. Work with it until you have the basic idea of the body maneuverings, footwork, and hand actions, then switch to a genuine steel sword. In the beginning your body, hands, and feet will never seem to be doing it right. You will always be feeling there is something somehow out of place, as though you are full of aches. But you should be steadfast and patient. Gradually it will seem to be more and more right until you are able to feel quite comfortable in it, and then eventually you will even enter a state in which the experience is downright pleasurable.

二、欲學練劍,最好先練拳,劍的形態多是拳的姿勢,舍徒手拳術練有基礎,(少林、長拳、查拳等)再學劍術輕而易擧,該驚虹劍的轉變意形,姿態步法架勢,與太祖長拳有極大相同,所以欲練劍先練拳,練各種器械亦然,都以先練拳為基礎。
2. If you wish to learn sword sets, the best thing to do is start by practicing boxing sets. The patterns in a sword set are usually based on boxing postures. Devote yourself to empty-hand sets to develop a foundation (whether it be Shaolin, Long Boxing, Cha Boxing, whatever), and then learning the sword art will be easy. In movement, posture, footwork, intent, and energy, the Startling-Rainbow Sword set is extremely similar to Taizu Long Boxing. Therefore if you wish to practice the sword, first practice the boxing. This is equally true for all weapons practice. Always begin with the boxing training to build a foundation.

三、無論做何事,要有恒心,學舞劍亦然,初學劍難,持久更難。務要保持敦厚誠篤之精神,寡慾淸心,守正存眞,虛心探討領會揣摩,盡力研究,精益求精,專力致功,勤練不輟,功到自然有成。
3. In every task you undertake, you have to be persevering, including the learning of a sword set. As difficult as it will be to learn it in the beginning, it will be still more difficult to follow it through to the end. You must maintain a spirit of sincerity. Clear your head by reducing your desires, sticking only to what is relevant and genuine. Delve into it with an open mind, and as you come to comprehend it, contemplate further. Put all your effort into the study of it, and as you approach perfection, seek to perfect it even more. Wholeheartedly work at it, for with diligent and unceasing practice, you will naturally succeed.

四、練劍多揑劍訣,左手持劍右手揑劍訣,右手持劍,左揑劍訣,劍訣者,即以拇指與無名指小指曲合,食指中指倂伸而成,以示愼重,而助精神,劍隨手指而增劍勢,更顯其藝術與風神。或有用掌者,亦無不可,但在傳統意識上,相傳多用劍訣,余以用劍訣為宜,更免與劈刀相混也。
4. Sword practice typically involves a “swordsman’s hex”. While your left hand is holding the sword, your right hand is pinched into a swordsman’s hex, and while your right hand is holding the sword, your left hand pinches to make the hex. To make the swordsman’s hex, the thumb, ring finger, and little finger bend in and join together, while the forefinger and middle finger are extended together. It expresses seriousness and thereby assists the spirit. The sword goes along with the movements of the hex, which adds to the sword postures and further displays its artistry and demeanor. There are those who instead just use a palm [as with a saber set], which is always equally acceptable, but the conventional mentality is that the tradition is to usually use the swordsman’s hex. I find the use of the hex to be appropriate, as it keeps sword and saber more distinct.

五、練習舞劍,余分為六個階段,一、練形:即各式形態姿勢,二、練敏:即動作敏捷靈活,三、練力:即氣勢力量,四、練神:即全神貫注,五、練意:即劍術效力使用,六、練化:即融會貫通,也就是把形、敏、力、神、意、化六字融化為一體,練至精純,不獨可隨意表演,而且應用裕如。
5. I divide the practice of the sword set into six levels:
     i. training the shape – getting the postures right,
     ii. training the agility – making the movements nimble,
     iii. training the power – imbuing the energy with force,
     iv. training the spirit – getting it to course through,
     v. training the intention – applying the techniques effectively,
     vi. training the adaptability – threading the techniques together continuously.
     Then take all six of these things and blend them to make an integrated whole. Once you have refined it through practice, you will not only be able to perform the set with ease, but also apply it effortlessly.

六、劍術係斷腕封喉,刺咽撩陰,有形砍形,無形砍影,象形會意,神到力到劍到,劍劍存眞實。勢勢不落空,以時代變遷,今非昔比,余著此驚虹劍術,每式取一學名,述其意義,以顯其藝術。術名略釋:以備應用,動作說明以便參考,姿勢例圖,俾供練習,余著此驚虹劍術,以藝術為主,以應用為輔,學者隨時留意體會,自然藝術與應用配合一致。
6. The sword art is concerned with making checking cuts to the wrist, sealing cuts to the neck, stabbing attacks to the throat, and raising cuts to the groin.
     When there is an opponent, cut the opponent. When there is no opponent, cleave instead through an image of one. By responding to imaginary opponents, you will arrive at understanding.
     Spirit arrives, then power arrives, then the sword arrives. When every sword action is authentic, no technique will miss.
     Because times have changed and the present has lost touch with the past, I have for each posture in this book:
     [i] presented its scholarly name, with an explanation of its significance to reveal its artistry,
     [ii] then paraphrased it with a technical name so as to equip you with an application,
     [iii] as well as supplied a movement description for easy reference,
     [iv] and also included a photo in order to supply a model to practice by.
     In making the book, I took the artistry of the sword set as the primary consideration and the applications as supplemental. By being always mindful of what you get from your own experience of it, the artistry and applicability will naturally come to complement each other.

十二、驚虹劍各勢名稱順序
TWELVE: STARTLING-RAINBOW SWORD POSTURE NAMES IN SEQUENCE

一、預備式
1. PREPARATION POSTURE
二、臥虎移步
2. CROUCHING TIGER SHIFTS A STEP
三、仙人指路
3. IMMORTAL POINTS THE WAY
四、陰陽合托
4. PASSIVE AND ACTIVE JOIN TO PROP UP
五、高祖斬蛇
5. GAOZU SLAYS THE SERPENT
六、潛龍待縱
6. HIDDEN DRAGON WAITS TO BE UNLEASHED
七、袖裡藏針
7. NEEDLE CONCEALED IN THE SLEEVE
八、盤龍刺虎
8. COILED DRAGON STABS THE TIGER
九、鷂子翻身
9. HAWK TURNS OVER
十、流星趕月
10. METEOR CHASES THE MOON
十一、轉身射雁
11. TURN AROUND, SHOOT THE GOOSE
十二、玉柱拒門
12. THE JADE BEAM BLOCKS THE DOORWAY
十三、登山趕月
13. CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN IN PURSUIT OF THE MOON
十四、趕山進香
14. RUN THROUGH THE HILLS TO OFFER INCENSE
十五、轉身射雁
15. TURN AROUND, SHOOT THE GOOSE
十六、玉柱拒門
16. THE JADE BEAM BLOCKS THE DOORWAY
十七、揖退三讓(一)
17. POLITELY RETREATING THREE TIMES – Part 1
十八、揖退三讓(二)
18. POLITELY RETREATING THREE TIMES – Part 2
十九、廻龍點珠
19. TURNING DRAGON POINTS TO THE PEARL
二十、黑虎偷心
20. BLACK TIGER STEALS THE HEART
二十一、哪吒献圈
21. NEZHA DISPLAYS HIS UNIVERSE RING
二十二、貪狼轉身
22. GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND
二十三、金蟾吐虹
23. GOLDEN TOAD SPITS OUT THE RAINBOW
二十四、風掃落葉
24. WIND SWEEPS AWAY THE FALLEN LEAVES
二十五、玉笛橫吹
25. PLAYING THE JADE FLUTE
二十六、二郎擔山
26. ERLANG CARRIES THE MOUNTAIN
二十七、天鳥飛瀑
27. SPIRIT BIRD FLIES OVER THE WATERFALL
二十八、跋步趕蟾
28. LUNGE TO CHASE THE MOON
二十九、太公釣魚
29. GRAND DUKE JIANG FISHES
三十、高祖斬蛇
30. GAOZU SLAYS THE SERPENT
三十一、追風趕船
31. THE CHASING WIND DRIVES THE BOAT
三十二、平分秋月
32. SPREADING EQUALLY TO BE LIKE THE AUTUMN MOON
三十三、黑虎抱頭
33. BLACK TIGER HIDES ITS HEAD
三十四、順水推舟
34. GOING ALONG WITH THE CURRENT TO PUSH THE BOAT
三十五、貪狼轉身
35. GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND
三十六、童孔拜佛
36. BOY HONORS BUDDHA
三十七、玉女穿梭
37. MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE
三十八、二郎擔山
38. ERLANG CARRIES THE MOUNTAIN
三十九、燕子抄水(一)
39. SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER – Part 1
四十、燕子抄水(二)
40. SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER – Part 2
四十一、翻身撲虎
41. TURN AROUND, POUNCING TIGER
四十二、龍飛鳳舞(一)
42. FLYING DRAGON, DANCING PHOENIX – Part 1
四十三、龍飛鳳舞(二)
43. FLYING DRAGON, DANCING PHOENIX – Part 2
四十四、金龍抱柱
44. GOLDEN DRAGON EMBRACES THE PILLAR
四十五、老鷹攫食
45. HAWK CAPTURES ITS PREY
四十六、奎星握筆
46. KUIXING HOLDS THE WRITING BRUSH
四十七、海底刺鰲
47. STABBING THE GIANT TURTLE UNDER THE SEA
四十八、犀牛望月
48. RHINO GAZES AT THE MOON
四十九、貪狼轉身
49. GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND
五十、金龍抱柱
50. GOLDEN DRAGON EMBRACES THE PILLAR
五十一、力劈三關
51. FORCEFUL CHOP THROUGH THREE GATES
五十二、懷中抱月
52. EMBRACE THE MOON
五十三、夜叉探海
53. NIGHT DEMON SEARCHES THE SEA
五十四、怪蟒翻身(一)
54. PYTHON TURNS AROUND – Part 1
五十五、怪蟒翻身(二)
55. PYTHON TURNS AROUND – Part 2
五十六、登山趕月
56. CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN IN PURSUIT OF THE MOON
五十七、魚跳龍門
57. CARP LEAPS THE DRAGON GATE
五十八、杏花春雨
58. APRICOT BLOSSOMS AND SPRING RAIN
五十九、飛龍驚虹
59. FLYING DRAGON, STARTLING RAINBOW
六十、完璧歸趙
60. RETURNING THE JADE TO ZHAO INTACT

十三、方向圖
THIRTEEN: ORIENTATION CHART
[Whereas many manuals use mock compass directions to orient you through the movements, Yin has chosen to use the far more confusing method of establishing a Left and Right based on the direction you are facing in your starting position, resulting in situations in which you will move to the Left while moving to your right or face to the Front while turning to your rear, and so on, forcing you to be extra mindful as to the direction intended.]


Rear

右後  ↖ ↑ ↗  左後
Right Rear       Left Rear

右 ← ┼ → 左
Right      Left

右前  ↙ ↓ ↘  左前
Right Front       Left Front

Front

注意:
Notes:
(一)預備式係面向前,無論身體如何變化轉動,其前後左右稱位,皆以此為準,各個姿勢說明,亦均按此圖為標準,預備式如站在方向圖的十字中心點,即可固定明瞭方向。
1. The PREPARATION POSTURE faces forward. Whatever direction you move toward – Front or Rear, Left or Right – they are always in accordance with this initial position. The written explanation for every posture is modeled upon this chart. The PREPARATION POSTURE is positioned at the cross in the center so you can clearly determine your orientation.
(二)姿勢圖中,有的以照相關係,其姿勢面向有稍移者,其方向統以動作說明為標準。
2. In the photos of the postures, some postures will appear to be shifted from their real orientation, in which case you should rely on the written text as the standard.

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - photo 1

[Sword in its scabbard]

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - photo 2

拔劍勢
Unsheathing the sword

十四、學名術名動作說明及姿勢圖(附圖五十一幀)
FOURTEEN: THE SCHOLARLY NAMES, TECHNICAL NAMES, MOVEMENT DESCRIPTIONS, AND PHOTOS OF THE POSTURES (including fifty-one photos)

(一)預備式
1. PREPARATION POSTURE

一、預備式意義:即開始之首要姿勢,未動之預備,以身心自然,精神貫注,目視全場環境一週,然後轉囘平視。
i. The significance of PREPARATION POSTURE:
     This is the most important posture at the start of the set, a preparation for movement. By way of naturalness of body and mind, spirit courses through. Having overseen the whole of your surroundings, your eyes are now turned to look straight ahead.
二、動作說明:頭正身直,閉嘴合牙疊舌,氣沈丹田,兩目平視,以自然之立正姿勢,左手反握劍柄,即以無名指小指拇指曲合握劍柄,以中指食指倂伸抵雲頭,劍鋒朝上平立,貼靠左臂後,右手揑劍訣兩手貼左右兩胯間,即成預備式。
ii. Movement description:
     Your head is upright, body straight. Your mouth is closed, teeth together, tongue curled upward. Energy sinks to your elixir field. Your eyes are looking straight ahead. You are in a natural standing posture. Your left hand is doing a reverse grasping of the sword handle [whereas an orthodox grasp would have the tiger’s mouth toward the hilt], gripping with the ring finger, little finger, and thumb, while the middle finger and forefinger are instead extended toward the pommel. The sword tip is pointing straight upward, touching the back of the forearm. Your right hand is pinched to form a “swordsman’s hex” and both hands are touching the area of your hips. This completes the PREPARATION POSTURE.
三、姿勢如下圖
iii. The posture is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 1

(二)臥虎移步
2. CROUCHING TIGER SHIFTS A STEP

一、學名「臥虎移步」意義:以兩腿蹲曲,用矮步前行,身搖臂擺如初醒之虎向前移步之勢,故名。
i. Scholarly name: CROUCHING TIGER SHIFTS A STEP
     Your legs bend into a squat and you walk to the Front in a low stance, your body swaying and your arms waving like a tiger beginning to wake and moving forward a step, hence the name.
二、術名「搖臂矮行」略釋:即兩腿下曲,矮步前行,此勢可練兩腿之彈力。
ii. Technical name: SWINGING ARMS WHILE WALKING LOW
     My legs bend downward and I walk forward in a low stance. This posture can train the springiness of the legs.
三、動作說明:以預備式蹲身曲腿矮步先出左腿,右臂後搖再出右腿,左臂後搖,再出左腿作活步勢,以左手反握劍,右手向前方指出。
iii. Movement description:
     From the previous posture, squat your body, bending your legs into a low stance. First step out with your left leg as your right arm swings behind, then step out with your right leg as your left arm swings behind, then step out again with your left leg, completing a series of lively steps, as your left hand holds the sword in a reverse grip and your right hand points out to the Front.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 2

(三)仙人指路
3. IMMORTAL POINTS THE WAY

一、學名「仙人指路」意義:以左腿變弓,右腿變蹬式,用右手向左前上向指去,如指道路然,故名(蹬式即箭步)。
i. Scholarly name: IMMORTAL POINTS THE WAY
     Your left leg changes to a bow stance, your right leg pressing, and your right hand goes forward and upward, pointing away to the Left as if you are pointing out a path, hence the name. (The pressing of your right leg means the arrow of the bow & arrow stance.)
二、術名「左摟右指」略釋,如太極拳中之摟膝腰部,以左手摟膝,右手向左上方指去。
ii. Technical name: LEFT BRUSHING, RIGHT POINTING
     Like in Taiji Boxing when I brush past my knee to my waist area, I use my left hand to brush past my knee as my right hand goes upward to point away to the Left.
三、動作說明:依前臥虎移步式,身起立,右腿靠上左腿,成原預備式,再開出左腿一步作弓式,左手摟膝附於左身後,右手揑訣向左上方指,目視右手訣。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your body stands up and your right leg moves up next to your left leg, making a return to the PREPARATION POSTURE. Then open up by stepping your left leg into a bow stance, your left hand brushing past your knee to be behind the left side of your body, your right hand’s hex going upward to point to the Left, your gaze toward your hex.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 3

(四)陰陽合托
4. PASSIVE AND ACTIVE JOIN TO PROP UP

一、學名「陰陽合托」意義:以左陰手右陽手,上下合握劍柄,擬接劍狀,故名。
i. Scholarly name: PASSIVE AND ACTIVE JOIN TO PROP UP
     Your left hand as the passive hand and your right hand as the active hand, they join above and below to grab the sword handle, in the manner of receiving the sword, hence the name.
二、術名「接劍勢」略釋,以右手收囘手心向上,左手握劍,手心向下,均收移至右脇下,同時腿曲身蹲而劍柄暗移交給右手中。
ii. Technical name: RECEIVING THE SWORD
     With my right hand withdrawing palm up and my left hand holding my sword with the palm downward, they both withdraw to be below my right ribs. At the same time, my legs bend and my body squats, the sword handle invisibly switching into my right hand.
三、動作說明:左手先上揚再下壓,右手囘收,身隨動搖兩手陰陽合托於右脇下,同時收左腿與右腿齊下蹲,左手之劍移交右手,形仍不動。
iii. Movement description:
     Your left hand first raises upward then presses downward, your right hand withdrawing, and your body sways along with the movement as both hands, passive and active, join and prop up below your right ribs. At the same time, your left leg withdraws to your right leg and they squat down together, and your left hand switches the sword to your right hand without the posture changing.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 4

(五)高祖斬蛇
5. GAOZU SLAYS THE SERPENT

一、學名「高祖斬蛇」意義:在雜記故事圖裡「漢高祖斬蛇圖」中有此一式,因舞劍學名即是一種藝術名,據此而定之。
i. Scholarly name: GAOZU SLAYS THE SERPENT
     There is a story of the Han Emperor Gaozu [also known as Liu Bang] beheading a snake, and there are depictions of it that show him in such a pose. This is a suitably artistic name for a posture in a sword dance.
二、術名「避劍待敵」略釋,亦名「接劍待舞」,左訣指出,右手握劍,擬舞動之勢。
ii. Technical name: EVADING WITH THE SWORD TO AWAIT THE OPPONENT, also called RECEIVING THE SWORD AND AWAITING THE CHANCE TO BRANDISH IT
     My left hand’s hex now points forth and my right hand holds my sword in a posture of intending to brandish it.
三、動作說明:依上式,身起右腿獨立,左腿上提脚尖扣襠,左手向左方以劍訣指出,右手握劍,劍身半藏右脇下,神注面前態勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your body lifts into a one-legged stance on your right leg, your left leg lifting with the toes hooking back toward your crotch, while your left hand points as a swordsman’s hex to the Left, your right hand holding the sword so that the sword body is half hidden below your right ribs, and your attention is forward.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 5

(六)潛龍待縱
6. HIDDEN DRAGON WAITS TO BE UNLEASHED

一、學名「潛龍待縱」意義:以劍尖向上反撩於頂前,以劍鋒撥動之姿態故名。
i. Scholarly name: HIDDEN DRAGON WAITS TO BE UNLEASHED
     The sword tip goes upward in a reverse raising action in front of your headtop as though deflecting, hence the name.
二、術名「撥鋒擬刺」略釋,以劍身向上抬起,以反手腕劍鋒半撩式,預備作下一動之態勢也。
ii. Technical name: DEFLECTING WITH THE EDGE, INTENDING TO STAB
     The body of my sword lifts up, my wrist turned over so the sword tip is half raised in a posture of readiness to make a downward action.
三、動作說明:原以高祖斬蛇式,右腿獨立不動,右手持劍向上抬起,反手腕劍柄向上翹,劍鋒稍下底,左訣隨劍鋒,稍斜倂伸於劍鋒下,兩目全神注劍鋒。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your stance does not change, but your right hand lifts up, the wrist turning over so the sword handle is raised upward and the tip slightly downward. Your left hand’s hex goes along with the sword by angling toward the tip, your eyes putting their full attention toward the tip.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 6

(七)袖裡藏針
7. NEEDLE CONCEALED IN THE SLEEVE

一、學名「袖裡藏針」意義:落下左脚,斜扭身,劍隨向下再轉上,劍身斜橫於胸前,半露劍鋒故名。
i. Scholarly name: NEEDLE CONCEALED IN THE SLEEVE
     Lowering your left foot, your torso twists to be diagonal, the sword going along with the movement by going downward then turning upward so the sword body is diagonal in front of your chest, showing the half with the tip, hence the name.
二、術名「藏劍待刺」略釋,以原式敵刺我下部時,我劍鋒下挿撥開敵之武器,再將劍身護胸前,以備攻刺之勢。
ii. Technical name: CONCEALED SWORD WAITING TO STAB
     From the previous posture, the enemy stabs to my lower body, so I stick my sword downward to deflect his weapon, then bring the sword body in to guard in front of my chest, in readiness to attack with a stab.
三、動作說明:依前式扭身落下左脚,劍鋒下落再轉上,劍身貼護於胸前,兩腿作交叉式,右反腕握劍,手心向懷裡,左訣附之。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, twist your torso while bringing down your left foot, the sword tip lowering then turning over upward so the sword body is guarding close in front of your chest, your legs making an overlapping stance. Your right wrist is turned over so the center of the hand is facing inward, your hex touching it.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 7

(八)盤龍刺虎
8. COILED DRAGON STABS THE TIGER

一、學名「盤龍刺虎」意義:叉步下蹲盤坐,刺出劍勢之謂也。
i. Scholarly name: COILED DRAGON STABS THE TIGER
     This represents crossing your stance and squatting down sitting twisted while stabbing out with the sword.
二、術名「盤腿下刺」叉步盤坐,進刺敵人之足部。
ii. Technical name: TWISTED STANCE, DOWNWARD STAB
     Sitting cross-legged, I thrust forward to the opponent’s foot.
三、動作說明:依上式先出右腿,左腿越蓋右腿,同時下曲盤坐,劍隨坐而向下斜刺,左手訣,變向頭上彎伸以助形勢,而目注劍鋒。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, first step out your right leg, then step your left leg through, covered over by your right leg, and both legs squat down in unison into a sitting twisted stance. The sword goes along with the sitting by stabbing diagonally downward while your hex moves to extend bent above your head to assist the posture, your gaze toward the sword tip.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 8

(九)鷂子翻身
9. HAWK TURNS OVER

一、學名「鷂子翻身」意義:依原式兩腿起立,劍隨身扭轉,一個大轉身,順勢下劈之謂也,故名。
i. Scholarly name: HAWK TURNS OVER
     Continuing from the previous posture, your legs rise to standing and the sword goes along with your body as your body spins all the way around then goes along with the momentum by chopping downward, hence the name.
二、術名「轉身劈劍」略釋,我一劍刺敵未着,迅即轉身再劈一劍之意。
ii. Technical name: TURN AROUND AND CHOP
     My stab to the opponent did not work, so I immediately spin around intent upon chopping him.
三、動作說明:依上式兩腿起立,身隨步轉,劍隨身轉,繞轉一圈,斜劍下劈,左弓右箭式,左訣斜上伸助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your legs rise to standing, your body goes along with your feet by spinning, and the sword goes along with your body by arcing in a complete circle to chop diagonally downward. You are in a stance of left bow, right arrow. Your hex is extended diagonally upward to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 9

(十)流星趕月
10. METEOR CHASES THE MOON

一、學名「流星趕月」意義:以連續兩劍均劃圓圈如月,劍光紛飛似星故名。
i. Scholarly name: METEOR CHASES THE MOON
     The sword continues into two more circles as though tracing the moon and the sword is making shining streaks like shooting stars, hence the name.
二、術名「劍劈連環」略釋:進右腿劈一劍,叉左腿再劈一劍,二劍連劈出而變下砍,阻敵無隙可乘。
ii. Technical name: CONTINUOUS CHOPPING
     My right leg advances with a chop of my sword, then my left leg steps through with another chop. With these two chops continuously cleaving through, the opponent has no gap to exploit.
三、動作說明:依上式,先進右腿劍由下向裡反上劃一圓形,左腿叉右腿後時,劍又照樣再劃一圓圈,盤膝下坐,右劍身下砍,左訣隨劍擺花最後伸直助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, first advance with your right leg as the sword goes inward from below, turning over upward, and makes a complete circle. Then when your left leg steps through behind your right leg, the sword arcs again through the same circle, and with your legs crossed and sitting down, the body of the sword cleaves downward. Your hex swings in flourishes along with the sword’s actions, finally stretching out to the rear to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 10

(十一)轉身射雁
11. TURN AROUND, SHOOT THE GOOSE

一、學名「轉身射雁」意義:以身拗轉劍鋒斜向上伸,劍訣倂列同向上指,如挽弓射空中之雁狀,故名。
i. Scholarly name: TURN AROUND, SHOOT THE GOOSE
     Your body turns around and the sword tip extends diagonally upward, your swordsman’s hex pointing upward along the same path. It is like you are about to draw a bow to shoot a goose in flight, hence the name.
二、術名「轉身上刺」略釋:我正以流星趕月勢,身後又來敵襲我,我猛轉身起立,上刺之面部。
ii. Technical name: TURN AROUND, STAB UPWARD
     While I am in the previous technique, an opponent comes at me from behind with a surprise attack, so I suddenly turn around, standing up, and stab upward to his face.
三、動作說明:依上式,身隨兩腿起立,向左扭轉,轉至面向前方,變為左弓右箭步,劍向前上伸,左訣倂列同伸,目注劍鋒。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your body goes along with your legs as they stand by twisting around to the left, and once you are squarely facing to the Front, make a stance of left bow and right arrow, the sword extending upward to the Front. Your hex extends parallel and your gaze is to the sword tip.
四、該式最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 11

(十二)玉柱拒門
12. THE JADE BEAM BLOCKS THE DOORWAY

一、學名「玉柱拒門」意義:以劍橫托於前頂上方如橫柱,遮護天門之勢,故名。
i. Scholarly name: THE JADE BEAM BLOCKS THE DOORWAY
     Use the sword to prop upward crosswise in front of your headtop, like a horizontal beam, to protect your forehead, hence the name.
二、術名「格托敵器」略釋:倘敵用長兵器擊我頭部,我以劍橫托敵之兵器之意。
ii. Technical name: BLOCK, PROPPING UP THE OPPONENT’S WEAPON
     If an opponent is using a long weapon to attack my head, I prop it up with my sword held horizontally.
三、動作說明:依上式進右腿劍稍收下按再向上托橫於額上,同時提起左腿,右腿作獨立勢,左訣附劍鋒下,頭稍仰目視劍身。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, advance your right leg as the sword slightly withdraws pushing downward. The sword then props upward crosswise above your forehead as your left leg lifts, your right leg now in a one-legged stance, your hex close below the sword tip. Your head is slightly leaned back, your gaze toward the sword body.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 12

(十三)登山趕月
13. CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN IN PURSUIT OF THE MOON

一、學名「登山趕月」意義:如月在空以劍向前上指,弓蹬步,似蹬山狀,故名。
i. Scholarly name: CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN IN PURSUIT OF THE MOON
     The sword goes forward and upward as though pointing at the moon in the sky,
and you are in a bow stance as though you are climbing a mountain, hence the name.
二、術名「斜上追刺」略釋:以前式猛抽劍乘勢剒刺敵之面部。
ii. Technical name: GOING DIAGONALLY UPWARD WITH A CHASING STAB
     From the previous posture, I suddenly draw in my sword and take advantage of the opportunity to make a filing stab to the opponent’s face.
三、動作說明:依上式左脚落下進一步弓式,劍隨下落向面前斜上伸,左訣蓋頭上伸,以助其勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left foot comes down advancing into a bow stance while the sword lowers in front of you, extended diagonally upward, your hex extending upward to cover your head, assisting the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 13

(十四)趕山進香
14. RUN THROUGH THE HILLS TO OFFER INCENSE

一、學名「趕山進香」意義:以連進一步,叉腿盤坐,劍身直立如挿香狀,故名。
i. Scholarly name: RUN THROUGH THE HILLS TO OFFER INCENSE
     Continue by advancing and stepping through into a sitting twisted stance with the sword body vertical as though you are inserting a stick of incense, hence the name.
二、術名「盤步剒敵」略釋:原以「登山趕月」式,敵刺我下部,我掛撥敵之武器,進步貼敵之身,劍直豎向下剒敵之意。
ii. Technical name: TWISTED STANCE, FILE CUT TO THE OPPONENT
     While in the previous posture, the opponent stabs to my lower body, so I use my sword in a hanging action to deflect his weapon, then advance to close in on his body with my sword filing downward upon him.
三、動作說明:乘上式,右腿落向前進一步,劍收轉劃一大圓圈,由上向下落劍鋒豎直,同時左腿叉於右腿後盤下坐,左訣附右手腕。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right leg advances, the sword withdrawing and making a full circle, coming downward from above with the tip straight up as your left leg steps through behind your right leg into a sitting twisted stance, your hex near your right wrist.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 14

(十五)轉身射雁全同第十式,請看前式。
15. TURN AROUND, SHOOT THE GOOSE – Same as Posture 10 [11].

(十六)玉柱拒門全同第十一式,請看前式。
16. THE JADE BEAM BLOCKS THE DOORWAY – Same as Posture 11 [12].

(十七)揖退三讓(一)
17. POLITELY RETREATING THREE TIMES – Part 1

一、學名「揖退三讓」意義:以此式退後三次,上開下避,此式為退步上開之勢。
i. Scholarly name: POLITELY RETREATING THE TIMES
     While spreading above and defending below, this posture retreats three times, hence the name.
二、術名「上開左退」略釋:敵擊我頭部時,退左步,劍向上撥開敵器。
ii. Technical name: SPREADING ABOVE WHILE RETREATING LEFT
     The opponent attacks my head, so I retreat my left leg, bringing my sword upward to deflect his weapon.
三、動作說明:依上式,左腿後退一步,成右弓左箭步,右劍向右格開,左手向左分指。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left leg retreats a step to make a stance of right bow and left arrow while the sword blocks aside to the Right and your hex spreads away to point to the Left.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖。
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 17

(十八)揖退三讓(二)
18. POLITELY RETREATING THREE TIMES – Part 2

一、學名「揖退三讓」意義:與前式同,此式為讓步下避式,故名。
i. Scholarly name: POLITELY RETREATING THREE TIMES
     Same as in the previous posture, now defending downward while retreating.
二、術名「右退下封」略釋:我劍上開,敵乘隙刺我下部,我急退右步,用劍以封截之。
ii. Technical name: RETREATING RIGHT WHILE COVERING BELOW
     As my sword spreads above, the opponent takes advantage of the gap to stab to my lower body, so I quickly retreat my right leg while using my sword to cover over his with a checking action.
三、動作說明:依上式退右步成蹬式(即箭步)左腿變弓,劍向下落封於身前下方,同時左手合捧劍柄以第一二兩式連續做三次,即合為揖退三讓。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, retreat your right leg to be a straightened arrow to your left leg’s bow while sending the sword to cover in front of your lower body, your left hand joining in holding the sword handle. Parts 1 and 2 are performed continuously a total of three times [i.e. defending above, below, above, below, above, below] to fulfill the name of the technique.
四、此為揖退三讓(二)之姿勢
iv. This is the second posture in POLITELY RETREATING THREE TIMES:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 18

(十九)廻龍點珠
19. TURNING DRAGON POINTS TO THE PEARL

一、學名「廻龍點珠」意義:以身大扭轉劍猛翻起向後劈下,着種劍尖之點力,故名。
i. Scholarly name: TURNING DRAGON POINTS TO THE PEARL
     As your body twists around grandly, the sword suddenly rises, turning over, then chops down behind you, with a tapping power in the tip, hence the name.
二、術名「翻身點劈」略釋:以前式,身後有敵來襲我,我猛扭轉身,向身後下方點劈,帶有弸勢。
ii. Technical name: TURN AROUND, TAPPING CHOP
     While in the previous posture, an opponent comes at me from behind with a surprise attack, so I suddenly turn around and do a tapping chop downward behind me with a flicking energy.
三、動作說明:乘上式右腿以箭變弓,左腿以弓變箭,扭轉身軀,劍隨之由上向身後下劈,左訣向上伸,以助劍勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right leg changes from arrow to bow, your left leg from bow to arrow, your body twisting around. The sword goes along with the movement by chopping down behind you from above, your left hand as a hex extending upward to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 19

(二十)黑虎偷心
20. BLACK TIGER STEALS THE HEART

一、學名「黑虎偸心」亦名「黃蜂鑽花」意義:使敵不防,以劍平直刺穿敵之心窩。故名。
i. Scholarly name: BLACK TIGER STEALS THE HEART, also called BEE BORES INTO THE FLOWER
     To catch an opponent unprepared, thrust the sword straight to his solar plexus, hence the name.
二、術名「直劍平刺」略釋:我正以廻龍點珠式,敵由身後來,我猛收左腿轉身,將劍伸平直刺敵之心窩。
ii. Technical name: DIRECT AND LEVEL SWORD THRUST
     While in the previous posture, an opponent comes at me from behind, so I suddenly withdraw my left leg while turning my body and thrust my sword straight to his solar plexus.
三、動作說明:乘上式,起右腿收左腿,面向前成立正式,劍由下直出端平,向面前伸直,左訣變護頂,以助其勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, stand up with your right leg, withdrawing your left leg, and make a stance of standing straight, facing to the Front, the sword stabbing out level from below, stretching to the Front, your hex again moving to guard your headtop to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 20

(二十一)哪吒献圈
21. NEZHA DISPLAYS HIS UNIVERSE RING

一、學名「哪吒献圈」意義:以劍在身前劃一大圓環,如圈狀,以動作之形而名。
i. Scholarly name: NEZHA DISPLAYS HIS UNIVERSE RING
     The sword draws a circle in front of you so large, it seems to be making a shape all around you, hence the name.
二、術名「劍護週身」略釋:以敵器在我身上下襲擊,我格其上而撥其下,劍舞迅速,使敵無隙可乘。
ii. Technical name: THE SWORD PROTECTS THE WHOLE BODY
     The opponent attacks me both above and below, so I block above and deflect below, my sword flourishing so quickly that he has no way through.
三、動作說明:乘上式,劍向懷收,先向左落下,轉右向上,動作時手腕在胸前動轉而用劍在身前劃一大圓圈,然後劍直豎於左肩前,同時提起右腿,左手輔護劍柄。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, the sword withdraws toward your chest by first lowering to the left, then turning upward to the right. During the movement, your wrist in front of your chest turns over and makes the sword trace a large circle in front of you which then brings the sword vertical in front of your left shoulder as you lift your right leg, your left hand assisting by guarding at the sword handle.
〔四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖〕
[iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:]

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 21

(二十二)貪狼轉身
22. GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND

一、學名「貪狼轉身」亦名「貪狼式」以急轉身,劍直砍敵之面門,寓意如狼兇猛之意,故名。
i. Scholarly name: GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND, also called GREEDY WOLF POSTURE
     Quickly turn around with the sword cleaving straight down to the opponent’s face, the metaphor alluding to the ferocity of a wolf, hence the name.
二、術名「轉身立砍」略釋:以猛轉身,劍斜豎立,直砍敵之面部。
ii. Technical name: TURN AROUND, CLEAVING VERTICALLY
     I turn around with fierceness, and with my sword diagonally vertical, I cleave straight to an opponent’s face.
三、動作說明:依上式原面向前,落下右脚,左腿向右一步,右轉身,成右弓左蹬式(蹬式即箭步)變而向左後方,右劍斜豎立,左訣斜上伸助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, which was facing to the Front, bring down your right foot, then your left leg steps to the Right as your body turns around to your right, and you make a stance of right bow and left arrow, facing to the Left Rear. The sword is diagonally vertical and your hex is extended diagonally upward to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 22

(二十三)金蟾吐虹
23. GOLDEN TOAD SPITS OUT THE RAINBOW

一、學名「金蟾吐虹」意義:以全身蜷伏,只劍鋒凸出直向上伸,如一道虹光然。
i. Scholarly name: GOLDEN TOAD SPITS OUT THE RAINBOW
     Your whole body is curled up on the ground with only the sword tip sticking out upward like a streak of rainbow shining.
二、術名「盤坐上衝」略釋:依前式,敵刺我右腿,右腿急撤一步,劍撥敵器,急下盤臥蜷伏,以劍直上刺敵之咽喉。
ii. Technical name: SITTING TWISTED, THRUSTING UPWARD
     While in the previous posture, an opponent stabs to my right leg, so I urgently withdraw it a step, deflecting his weapon with my sword, and suddenly twist downward until curled up on the ground, using my sword to stab straight upward to his throat.
三、動作說明:依上式右腿向右方撤一步(即向身後)劍隨向下挽一花,再退左腿叉於右腿下盤蜷臥劍鋒直向上伸,左訣附右肩頭助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right leg withdraws a step behind you, the sword going along with the movement by going downward into a rolling flourish, then your left leg steps through under your right leg so you are twisted and curled up on the ground, the sword edge extending straight upward, your hex near the top of your left shoulder to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 23

(二十四)風掃落葉
24. WIND SWEEPS AWAY THE FALLEN LEAVES

一、學名「風掃落葉」意義:以劍平端,劍鋒向外繞轉一週,如風吹樹葉旋轉之狀。
i. Scholarly name: WIND SWEEPS AWAY THE FALLEN LEAVES
     Carry the sword level, the tip facing outward, as you twist all the way around like a swirling wind blowing the leaves.
二、術名「拋劍護身」略釋:我以前臥式,群敵近我,我猛起身,以劍橫掃護身之意。
ii. Technical name: FLING OUT THE SWORD TO PROTECT THE BODY
     When in the previous posture, a crowd of opponents close in on me, so I suddenly rise up, using my sword to sweep across and protect my body.
三、動作說明:依上式兩腿起立交叉,劍下落與肩平,兩手相平對伸,繞身轉一週,轉至面向前,兩腿仍作交叉之勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your legs stand, still crossed, the sword lowering until at shoulder level, both hands extending level, and turn your body all the way around [to your left] until squared to the Front, your legs again crossed.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 24

(二十五)玉笛橫吹
25. PLAYING THE JADE FLUTE

一、學名「玉笛橫吹」意義:劍橫置於胸上頷下幾靠近嘴,劍橫如笛,左訣形似按笛,故名。
i. Scholarly name: PLAYING THE JADE FLUTE
     The sword is placed higher than your chest and lower than your chin, somewhat nearing your mouth, and is held horizontally like a flute, your hex seeming to press at one of the flute’s holes, hence the name.
二、術名「橫劍察勢」略釋:拋劍繞身一週後,置於胸前上方,以觀敵勢。
ii. Technical name: BRINGING THE SWORD ACROSS TO WATCH FOR WHAT WILL COME
     After flinging the sword all the way around my body, I place it upward in front of my chest and observe the opponents’ actions.
三、動作說明:依上式右脚抽靠左脚上提成左腿獨立勢,同時劍下落在身前挽一花,橫托於頷前,左訣收輔右劍柄處。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right foot draws in close to your left leg, making a left one-legged stance, while the sword lowers in front of you into a rolling flourish, and props up in front of your chin, your hex coming in to assist at the sword handle.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖。
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 25

(二十六)二郎擔山
26. ERLANG CARRIES THE MOUNTAIN

一、學名「二郎擔山」意義:以右劍左訣向左右平伸,如人擔物狀故名。
i. Scholarly name: ERLANG CARRIES THE MOUNTAIN
     Sword and hex extend level to Right and Left, like a man carrying something on his shoulders, hence the name.
二、術名「分手平刺」略釋:以上式橫劍,劍鋒向右方刺出,同時換右腿獨立式,而左訣向左分伸,目注左訣。
ii. Technical name: HANDS SPREADING WITH A LEVEL STAB
     From the previous posture, my sword tip stabs out to the Right as I switch to a right one-legged stance, then I extend my hex to the Left, where my attention goes.
三、動作說明:依上式,右脚向右開落下,提起左腿,同時劍鋒向右端平伸直,左訣向左平伸助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right foot comes down, stepping out to the Right, and your left leg lifts. At the same time, the sword tip extends level to the right and your hex extends level to the Left to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 26

(二十七)天鳥飛瀑
27. SPIRIT BIRD FLIES OVER THE WATERFALL

一、學名「天鳥飛瀑」亦稱「懷中抱月」意義:以抬拋左腿同拋左臂,如鳥疾飛越入瀑布狀,但最後姿勢,如下圖,稱為懷中抱月。
i. Scholarly name: SPIRIT BIRD FLIES OVER THE WATERFALL, also called EMBRACE THE MOON
     Lift your left leg and throw it across with your left arm, like a bird quickly flying over a waterfall, to end up in the posture in the photo, which is called EMBRACE THE MOON.
二、術名「扭身措劈」略釋:抬起左腿向左平拋,右腿隨跟,劍由上向下斜劈剒。
ii. Technical name: TWISTING BODY, FILING CHOP
     I throw my lifted left leg to my left, my right leg following along, the sword coming down diagonally with a filing chop. [This movement is similar to doing a whirlwind kick ending with a planting punch.]
三、動作說明:依上二郎擔山式,左腿向身後抬平落下,左手隨之,右劍由頂上向下斜劈剒,同時上右腿同左腿下蹲,劍收小腹下,劍鋒斜向上方,最後姿勢稱為懷中抱月。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, lift your left leg across behind you and bring it down, your left hand going along with it, and the sword comes down from over your head with a filing chop as your right leg squats down with your left leg, the sword gathering in below your belly, the tip diagonally upward. The posture at the end of the movement is called EMBRACE THE MOON.
四、該式之最後姿勢稱為「懷中抱月」如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement with EMBRACE THE MOON, as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 27

(二十八)跋步趕蟾
28. LUNGE TO CHASE THE MOON

一、學名「跋步趕蟾」意義:係躍步前進,急趕之謂,勢似追逐,故名。
i. Scholarly name: LUNGE TO CHASE THE MOON
     This relates to leaping and advancing to urgently pursue, the posture seeming to chase, hence the name.
二、術名「躍步追砍」略釋:我正以懷中抱月之勢,身後突來敵襲我,我急轉身拔步急追砍敵。
ii. Technical name: JUMPING STEP, CHASING CHOP
     While I am in the posture of EMBRACE THE MOON, an opponent charges at me from behind to make a surprise attack, so I suddenly turn around and lunge in to meet him with a chop.
三、動作說明:依上式,抬邁右腿一躍上拔,左腿隨進一步,右腿連進一步,劍隨步進由上向下砍,左訣上斜助勢,最後姿勢同「廻龍點珠」,但此式面向左前方。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right foot jumps, then your left foot advances a step, continuing into your right foot advancing a step. The sword goes along with the steps by chopping down from above, your hex going diagonally above you to assist the posture. The final posture is the same as in TURNING DRAGON POINTS TO THE PEARL, but this time facing to the Left.
四、該式最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 28

(二十九)太公釣魚
29. GRAND DUKE JIANG FISHES

一、學名「太公釣魚」意義:以曲腿彎腰,反手腕劍斜上指如釣竿,狀如垂釣,故名。
i. Scholarly name: GRAND DUKE JIANG FISHES
     Bending your legs and bending at the waist, turn over your wrist so the sword is pointing diagonally upward like a fishing pole, putting you in a posture like you are angling with a fishing line, hence the name.
二、術名「攔截反撩」略釋:我以前式,敵進刺我小腹,我劍囘提攔截,順將劍反上撩,點敵之手腕。
ii. Technical name: BLOCKING CUT, REVERSE RAISING
     While in the previous posture, the opponent advances with a stab to my lower abdomen, so I withdraw my sword, lifting it to intercept, then take advantage of the moment by turning it over into an upward raising cut to his wrist.
三、動作說明:依上式,先收左脚靠右脚,右脚再提起前移稍虛,劍囘抽提至胸前,翻手腕,劍鋒向外擺反撩,兩腿同下曲,左訣收附劍柄,劍鋒斜向上兩目注之。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, first bring in your left foot to stand next to your right foot, then your right foot lifts and shifts forward, slightly empty, as the sword withdraws, lifting until in front of your chest, the wrist turned over, the sword tip moving outward with a reverse raising cut, both legs bending down together. Your hex has come in to touch the sword handle, the sword tip is diagonally upward, and your gaze is toward it.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 29

(三十)「高祖斬蛇」以上式,左脚踐實右脚進一步,再提起左脚,右作腿獨立,同第五式。
30. GAOZU SLAYS THE SERPENT – Continuing from the previous posture, your left foot is full and now your right foot advances, then your left leg lifts to make a right one-legged stance as in Posture 5.

(三十一)追風趕船
31. THE CHASING WIND DRIVES THE BOAT

一、學名「追風趕船」意義:以迅步急行加以躍進,如風颳之勢,故名。
i. Scholarly name: THE CHASING WIND DRIVES THE BOAT
     Rush forward with rapid steps, including a jump, like the wind blowing, hence the name.
二、術名「跟踪追敵」略釋:以前式敵擊我不成,欲行逃避,我迅步連躍,急進追刺之意。
ii. Technical name: FOLLOW THE OPPONENT’S TRAIL TO CHASE HIM
     In the previous posture, the opponent’s attack did not work and he wants to escape, so I quickly step, continuing into a jump, and rapidly advance with a chasing stab.
三、動作說明:依上式,左脚落進一步,右脚亦進一步,左脚再一步時躍起,右脚隨進一步,左脚連進一步成弓式,同時伸直左訣倂列。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left foot comes down advancing a step, your right foot also advances a step, then your left foot steps as a jump, your right foot advances, and your left foot advances again, making a bow stance, while the sword extends together with your hex.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 31

(三十二)平分秋月
32. SPREADING EQUALLY TO BE LIKE THE AUTUMN MOON

一、學名「平分秋月」意義:以兩手分開,左右均勢平伸,虛懷若谷,如秋月之爽,故名。
i. Scholarly name: SPREADING EQUALLY TO BE LIKE THE AUTUMN MOON
     Your hands spread apart equally, extending level to the Left and Right, emptying the space in front of your chest like a valley, until expressing the fullness of the autumn moon [i.e. the full moon of the Mid-Autumn Festival, the hands “spreading equally” also reflecting the division between early autumn ending and late autumn beginning],
hence the name.
二、術名「反劍平拋」略釋:以上式追刺敵人我身後又來敵人,猛囘頭翻身,陰劍平拋之意。
ii. Technical name: TURNING OVER THE SWORD, FLING IT ACROSS
     While in the previous posture, another opponent comes to attack me from behind, so I suddenly turn around and fling my sword across as a “passive sword”.
三、動作說明:依上式,陰劍落平,(陰劍即手心向下)翻身劍平拋一大半圈,兩手平伸分開,變右弓步左箭步。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, as a passive sword (meaning the center of the hand faces downward [turning over from facing to your left as in the previous posture]), the sword lowers to be level [having been stabbing slightly upward], and once the sword body is turned over, it flings across in a large semicircle, both hands spreading apart to be extended level, [as you turn around and step back with your right foot,] your stance becoming right bow, left arrow [left bow, right arrow].
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 32

(三十三)黑虎抱頭
33. BLACK TIGER HIDES ITS HEAD

一、學名「黑虎抱虎」意義:以兩手由左右合抱,劍向後抽捧至胸前,似虎之兩前腿合抱之勢,如太極劍虎抱頭式。
i. Scholarly name: BLACK TIGER HIDES ITS HEAD
     Your hands come together and embrace, then you draw in the sword propped up in front of your chest, with the appearance of a tiger wrapping in its front legs, hence the name. [As a tiger crouches in the grass, observing prey and readying itself to pounce, it lowers itself to the point that it seems about to wrap its paws all the way over its head. The connotation of a tiger “hiding its head” or “covering its head” or “holding its head” is a tiger in a posture of preparing to pounce.]
二、術名「平拋抽剒」略釋:如敵在我前我進右步以劍平拋其腰部,再向懷中抽剒之(在拙著太極劍第三十五式係最後姿勢)。
ii. Technical name: HAVING FLUNG ACROSS, DRAW IN WITH A FILING CUT
     I advance toward the opponent in front of me, flinging my sword across to his waist, then draw in with a filing cut in front of my chest (as per Posture 35 of my Taiji Sword book).
三、動作說明:依上式左右手向懷中合抱,抽至臍下,同時左腿稍曲下蹲,右腿稍撤變虛步,脚尖點地,成半仆步勢,劍鋒斜向面前上方(即面向右方)。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your hands embrace in front of you [as your right leg steps forward into a right bow stance,] then your hands draw in until below navel level as your left leg slightly bends into a squat and your right leg slightly withdraws into an empty stance, toes touching down, making a half-crouched posture, the sword tip pointing diagonally forward to the Right.
四、該式動作中停姿勢如下圖
iv. The middle of this posture’s movement is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 33

[The photo from his Taiji Sword book shows this posture at the end of its movement:]

《太極劍》 尹千合 (1958) - posture 35

(三十四)順水推舟
34. GOING ALONG WITH THE CURRENT TO PUSH THE BOAT

一、學名「順水推舟」意義:以劍倒提斜掛,進左步,左訣附劍身裡,如推物狀故名。
i. Scholarly name: GOING ALONG WITH THE CURRENT TO PUSH THE BOAT
     The sword turns over and lifts up hanging at an angle as your left foot advances, your hex near to the inside of the sword body, so you have the appearance of pushing something, hence the name.
二、術名「攔截敵器」略釋:倘敵以器械擊我腹部,我急收劍向外推截之。
ii. Technical name: BLOCKING THE OPPONENT’S WEAPON
     If the opponent attacks my belly, I quickly withdraw my sword and push it outward to intercept his weapon.
三、動作說明:劍由下向上反,再轉至劍鋒斜向下時,進左步弓式,右手握劍斜倒掛,左訣隔附劍身裡。
iii. Movement description:
     The sword turns over and goes upward from below, and when it has turned to the point that the tip is in front pointing diagonally downward, you have advanced into a left bow stance, your right hand hanging the sword upside-down and pointing away diagonally, your hex near though not touching to the inside of the sword body.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 34

(三十五)「貪狼轉身」同第二十二式,請看前圖。
35. GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND – same as Posture 22.

(三十六)童子拜佛
36. BOY HONORS BUDDHA

一、學名「童子拜佛」意義:以曲腿半跪坐,右避劍,左訣如致佛禮之意。
i. Scholarly name: BOY HONORS BUDDHA
     Bend your legs into a half squat, the sword guarding, your hex in a prayer-hand position as if honoring the Buddha.
二、術名「低勢觀敵」略釋:以貪狼式,敵刺我下部時,我急撤右步,以劍下撥敵器,矮身下蹲,以觀敵勢。
ii. Technical name: LOWERING TO OBSERVE THE OPPONENT
     While in the previous posture, an opponent [behind me] stabs to my lower body, so I quickly withdraw my right leg while using my sword to deflect his weapon, shortening my body by squatting down, and observe for what he will do next.
三、動作說明:乘以上貪狼式,落右劍收右腿,左腿再叉於右腿下,同下跪蹲,劍附右脇下,左訣面前指(即面向左方)。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, [turn around and] lower the sword by your right thigh as your left leg steps through to be under your right leg and they squat in unison, the sword below your right ribs, your hex facing forward [though pointing upward] to the Left.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 36

(三十七)玉女穿梭
37. MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE

一、學名「玉女穿梭」意義:以向面前行進,左右手搖擺,劍作前後抽刺,如織布梭之行動,故名。
i. Scholarly name: MAIDEN WORKS THE SHUTTLE
     While advancing with your steps, your hands swing, the sword making actions of stabbing out then drawing in, like the operations of the shuttle when weaving cloth, hence the name.
二、術名「連續抽刺」略釋:以左脚進,劍亦進,右腿進劍後抽,連續抽刺之意。
ii. Technical name: FLOWING FROM STABBING TO DRAWING IN
     My sword advances with the advancing of my left [right] foot, then draws in with the advancing of my right [left] foot, continuing from one action to the other.
三、動作說明:依上式起立,先出左步,同時出劍,左訣後擺,再出右步,左訣伸出,劍避右脇下,右腿挺伸,輕點地上。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, first step out with your left [right] foot, sending out the sword as your hex swings behind you, then step out with your right [left] foot, sending out your hex as the sword defends below your right ribs, your right leg straight and lightly touching down.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 37

(三十八)「二郎擔山」右脚踏實獨立左脚提起,面轉向右方,同二十六式。(前式向左方,此式面向右方)
38. ERLANG CARRIES THE MOUNTAIN – Your right foot fills and stands one-legged as your left foot lifts and you turn to face to the Right. It is the same as Posture 26, but this time facing to the Right.

(三十九)燕子抄水(一)
39. SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER – Part 1

一、學名「燕子抄水」意義:以奔跑之勢,劍鋒在後斜提向下點動,如燕子在水上點水狀,故名。
i. Scholarly name: SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER
     Run with the sword tip behind you diagonally lifting and tapping down, like a swallow tapping the water as it flies over it, hence the name.
二、術名「詐敗誘敵」略釋:以上式敵來刺我下部,落下左脚,右腿變箭仆式,以劍隨右腿向下點劈,以撥敵器。
ii. Technical name: FEIGN DEFEAT TO LURE IN THE OPPONENT
     While in the previous posture, the opponent stabs to my lower body, so I bring down my left foot, my right leg straightening to make a bow and arrow stance, my sword doing a tapping chop parallel with my right leg to deflect his weapon.
三、動作說明:依上式左脚落下弓式,右腿變箭仆式,劍隨下落,護於右腿外左訣斜上伸,目囘顧劍鋒,形如下圖。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left foot comes down into a bow stance, your right straightening like an arrow, the sword lowering to guard to the outside of your right leg as your hex extends diagonally upward. Your gaze is turned back toward the sword tip. The posture is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 39

(四十)燕子抄水(二)
40. SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER – Part 2

一、學名「燕子抄水」意義:以劍斜向下垂,奔走時劍鋒隨點,其勢如燕子在水上點水狀,意義同前式。
i. Scholarly name: SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER – Same as the explanation in the previous posture.
二、術名「詐敗誘敵」略釋:以敗勢奔走,敵追我,我敗急走,以待有利形勢。
ii. Technical name: FEIGN DEFEAT TO LURE IN THE OPPONENT
     Running away feigning defeat, the opponent chases me and I quickly flee, waiting for the most advantageous moment.
三、動作說明:依前式右腿向右方進一步,蓋左膝作交叉勢,左訣不動,劍鋒同時下點,連續將(一)(二)兩式作三遍,即謂之燕子三抄水,此式多走幾步也沒關係,要步子恰當,以便做下一式。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right leg advances a step, covering your left knee to make an overlapping stance, your hex staying as it is while the sword again taps down.
     Parts 1 and 2 are performed continuously three times [To clarify, Parts 1 and 2 and a repeat of Part 1 are performed continuously three times, stepping left bow, then right overlapping, then left bow, performing a total of three taps.], and so the technique could be called SWALLOW TAKES UP THREE GULPS OF WATER. But the number of steps does not really matter, only that the pace of the stepping is appropriate to smoothly flow into the following posture.
四、該式動作中停姿態如下圖
iv. The middle of this posture’s movement is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 40

(四十一)翻身撲虎
41. TURN AROUND, POUNCING TIGER

一、學名「翻身撲虎」意義:以拗腰翻身,右腿下仆,劍隨下砍之意,如太極之捕虎式。
i. Scholarly name: TURN AROUND, POUNCING TIGER
     Twist your waist and turn around, your right leg flattening out below as the sword cleaves downward, hence the name.
二、術名「敗中取勝」略釋:我以上敗式,猛囘頭翻身,劍向下砍,出敵不意而破之。
ii. Technical name: IN THE MIDST OF DEFEAT, SEIZE VICTORY
     From feigning defeat, I suddenly turn around with my sword cleaving downward, taking the opponent by surprise to defeat him.
三、動作說明:奔走數步走至燕子抄水之最後第一式,拗腰翻身,左脚為軸,右腿抬起隨身轉至左方,劍亦之下砍於右仆腿裡,左訣向劍方伸指,而助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Having just repeated Part 1 of SWALLOW TAKES UP WATER, twist your waist and turn your body, using your left foot as a pivot, your right leg lifting and going along with your body as it spins around to your left, and then the sword cleaves downward to the inside of your straightened right leg, your hex pointing in the same direction as your right leg to assist the posture.
四、該式最後動作如下圖
iv. This posture’s final movement is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 41

(四十二)龍飛鳳舞(一)
42. FLYING DRAGON, DANCING PHOENIX – Part 1

一、學名「龍飛鳳舞」意義:以活步行走,拗腿、搖臂、舞劍,其動作搖擺圓轉如飛似舞之意,故名。
i. Scholarly name: FLYING DRAGON, DANCING PHOENIX
     Walk with lively steps, twisting thighs, swinging arms, and dancing sword, the movement swaying and curving like flying and dancing, hence the name.
二、術名「左右進撩」略釋:以上式翻手腕,劍向上剒撥敵器,再進步劍隨勢撩敵之胸部。
ii. Technical name: ADVANCING, RAISING RIGHT THEN LEFT
     From the previous posture, I turn over my right wrist and send my sword upward with a filing cut to deflect the opponent’s weapon, then I advance with my sword doing a raising cut to the opponent’s chest.
三、動作說明:依上式左手腕上翻,劍隨上起,至頂門時,再向下,整劃一大圓圈,同時右腿起立,左腿進一步,劍鋒斜向上,左訣上指。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left [right] wrist turns over as the sword lifts up. Once at headtop level, the sword again goes downward, tracing a large circle [on your left side] as your right foot lifts a moment and your left leg advances, the sword tip moving diagonally upward, your hex pointing upward.
四、該式動作中停姿勢如下圖
iv. The middle [finish] of this posture’s movement is as in the photo below [This and the following photo had accidentally been switched with each other in the original book.]:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 42

(四十三)龍飛鳳舞(二)
43. FLYING DRAGON, DANCING PHOENIX – Part 2

一、學名「龍飛鳳舞」意義:以拗腰擺臂,滑步舞劍,其勢如舞如飛,故名。
i. Scholarly name: FLYING DRAGON, DANCING PHOENIX
     Twisting waist, swinging arms, gliding steps, dancing sword, movement like dancing and flying, as explained above.
二、術名「左右擺劍」略釋:先是以左擺劍進撩,再右擺劍進撩,左右連擺使敵無隙可乘。
ii. Technical name: SWORD SWINGS LEFT THEN RIGHT
     First I had swung my sword to the left into a raising cut while advancing, now I swing my sword to the right into a raising cut while advancing, going continuously from left to right to keep the opponent from getting a way in.
三、動作說明:依上式,劍向身後,再向左方反撩,同時進右腿,即再將第(一)式重演一次,然後轉身面向正前方,兩腿分開弓立,兩臂向左右斜上伸,稍帶彎曲。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, the sword goes behind you, then does a reverse raising cut to the Left as your right leg advances.
     (Then you will repeat Part 1, and then turn your torso so it is squared to the Front, both legs still in a bow stance, your arms extending diagonally upward to both sides, slightly bent.)
四、該式最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 43

(四十四)金龍抱柱
44. GOLDEN DRAGON EMBRACES THE PILLAR

一、學名「金龍抱柱」意義:一腿獨立,右劍身斜避胸前,只劍鋒半露,左訣在頂上,如龍尾上伸。
i. Scholarly name: GOLDEN DRAGON EMBRACES THE PILLAR
     Standing on one leg, the sword body guarding diagonally in front of your chest so that only the tip half of the sword is showing, your hex goes above your headtop like a dragon’s tail, hence the name.
二、術名「獨立避劍」略釋:舞劍並非每式均有用處,其中多有連接姿勢,只有鬪勢,則缺乏藝術意味,此為避劍觀敵之動態也。
ii. Technical name: ONE-LEGGED STANCE, GUARDING WITH THE SWORD
     Not every posture in a sword set has practical function, some being simply transitions between techniques. If it had only fighting postures, it would have less artistic flavor. In this posture, I am guarding with my sword while observing for how the opponent will move next.
三、動作說明:依上式右劍挽一花,手腕向左下垂至腹部,劍鋒半露右肩上,右腿提起,左獨立勢,左訣護頂上。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, the sword does a rolling flourish and the wrist comes over to your left side to hang down in front of your abdomen, the tip half of the sword showing above your right shoulder, as your right leg lifts, your left leg standing one-legged, your hex guarding above your headtop.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 44

(四十五)老鷹攫食
45. HAWK CAPTURES ITS PREY

一、學名「老鷹攫食」意義:以躍步拗身下蹲,劍下落如捕物狀,形似鷹於空中下降之勢,故名。
i. Scholarly name: HAWK CAPTURES ITS PREY
     Jump, body twisting, and squat down, the sword coming down as though catching something, in the manner of a hawk descending from the sky, hence the name.
二、術名「盤坐切砍」略釋:以劍撥開敵之武器,轉身進步盤坐,以劍由上向下切砍敵足。
ii. Technical name: SITTING TWISTED, CLEAVING THROUGH
     I use my sword to deflect away the opponent’s weapon, turning my body, and advance into a sitting twisted stance with my sword cleaving down from above toward his foot.
三、動作說明:依上式落右腿推出劍身,再往下撥開敵器,再進左步,右腿叉於左膝後下蹲,右劍以下轉上再下落,左訣隨按轉右劍柄。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, bring down your right leg, pushing out the sword body then bringing it downward to deflect the opponent’s weapon. Then your left foot advances and your right leg steps through behind your left knee, both legs squatting down, while the sword continues downward, turns over upward, and comes down again, your hex going along with the movement by pushing down on the sword handle.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 45

(四十六)奎星握筆
46. KUIXING HOLDS THE WRITING BRUSH

一、學名「奎星握筆」意義:以右手握劍,橫托於頂上,如奎星點狀元之塑像狀,故名。
i. Scholarly name: KUIXING HOLDS THE WRITING BRUSH
     Your right hand holds the sword horizontally above your headtop, like the statues of Kuixing pointing out who the top scholar is, hence the name.
二、術名「向上抑托」我正以下砍式,敵用武器擊我頭部時,我猛起身以劍托之,以保護頭部。
ii. Technical name: PROPPING UPWARD
     While in the previous posture, the opponent uses his weapon to attack my head, so I suddenly rise up while propping my sword up to protect my head.
三、動作說明:依上式起身,反手腕,劍向上托,同時提起左腿右腿獨立,左訣在劍鋒下相對上伸。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your body rises and the sword props up, the wrist turning over. At the same time, your left leg lifts and your right leg stands one-legged, your hex extending upward to point toward the sword tip from below.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 46

(四十七)海底刺鰲
47. STABBING THE GIANT TURTLE UNDER THE SEA

一、學名「海底刺鰲」意義:以右脚獨立,左脚曲抬,劍斜直向地下刺勢,故名。
i. Scholarly name: STABBING THE GIANT TURTLE UNDER THE SEA
     Go into a right one-legged stance, your left leg bending and lifting, the sword stabbing diagonally downward toward the ground, hence the name.
二、術名「扭身下刺」略釋:敵刺我下部,我劍鋒下挿以撥敵器,轉上再向下刺敵之脚部。
ii. Technical name: TWISTING BODY, DOWNWARD STAB
     The opponent stabs to my lower body, so I stick my sword tip downward to deflect his weapon, then turn it upward then again downward to stab to his foot.
三、動作說明:依上式,左脚下落向左扭身,劍鋒順向下,進右步作獨立勢,劍鋒反上再行下刺,左腿曲提護襠,左訣護頂上。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left foot comes down, your body twisting to your left, the sword following the movement downward, then your right leg stands one-legged, the sword tip turning over upward then downward as your left leg bends in and lifts to guard your crotch, your hex moving to guard above your headtop.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 47

(四十八)犀牛望月
48. RHINO GAZES AT THE MOON

一、學名「犀牛望月」意義:以扭頭囘望,順劍向身後睨望,如斜望將落之月然。故名。
i. Scholarly name: RHINO GAZES AT THE MOON
     Turning your head to gaze behind, the sword aligns parallel with your sideways glance, as if your angled gaze falls upon the moon, hence the name.
二、術名「反撩剒腕」略釋:我前以刺鰲式,敵擬刺我胸部我急變招,劍鋒向上拉剒敵之手腕之意。
ii. Technical name: REVERSE RAISING, FILING CUT TO THE WRIST
     While in the previous posture, the opponent intends to stab to may chest, so I adapt, sending my sword tip upward and pulling in with a filing cut to his wrist.
三、動作說明:依上式,急落左腿弓式,反手腕劍向上撩,右腿變半仆式,劍隨身帶,橫於胸前,斜拗身,半囘頭,左訣附右劍柄。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, quickly bring down your left leg into a bow stance, right leg straightening, while turning your wrist over and raising the sword upward, your body twisting to be halfway looking back, the sword going along with your body by pulling in to be horizontal in front of your chest, your hex touching the sword handle.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 48

(四十九)「貪狼轉身」同三十二式請看前圖。
49. GREEDY WOLF TURNS AROUND – same as Posture 32 [22].

(五十)「金龍抱柱」同四十四式,不過前式面向右前方,此式面向左後方。
50. GOLDEN DRAGON EMBRACES THE PILLAR – same as Posture 44, but this time facing to the Left Rear.

(五十一)力劈三關
51. FORCEFUL CHOP THROUGH THREE GATES

一、學名「力劈三關」意義:以叉腿斜刺,翻身下劈,連續做三次之謂也。
i. Scholarly name: FORCEFUL CHOP THROUGH THREE GATES
     Stab diagonally downward in an overlapping stance, then continuously turn around chopping downward three times, hence the name.
二、術名「轉身連劈」略釋:即以叉腿斜刺不着,再翻身劈劍,連續不斷做三次,使敵窮於招架。
ii. Technical name: TURNING AROUND WITH CONTINUOUS CHOPPING
     Having missed after stabbing diagonally downward in an overlapping stance, I then turn around chopping downward three times without pause, making it hard for the opponent to parry.
三、動作說明:依上式,落下右腿,左腿叉於右腿後劍斜下刺,左訣上伸,再拗身反轉下劈,連續做三次,最後之勢如第九式。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right leg comes down and your left leg steps through behind your right leg as the sword stabs diagonally downward, your hex extending upward, then your body twists into turning all the way around while chopping downward, which is done three times, then finishing in the same ending posture as in Posture 9.
四、該式係中停一姿勢。如下圖
iv. The middle of this posture’s movement is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 51

(五十二)「懷中抱月」形同二十七式之最後姿勢,即將劍抽收置於懷中,虛右步下蹲,此式面向右前方。
52. EMBRACE THE MOON – same as the end of Posture 27 in that the sword is withdrawn in front of your chest and you squat down with your right foot empty, but this time facing to the Right Front.

(五十三)夜叉探海
53. NIGHT DEMON SEARCHES THE SEA

一、學名「夜叉探海」意義:所用學名,多尊古姿勢之名,取其藝術而名之,此式隨俗仍名之為夜叉探海。
i. Scholarly name: NIGHT DEMON SEARCHES THE SEA
     When employing scholarly names, many are names of venerated ancient postures, the names reused to establish association with their original artistry, and the name of this posture follows the convention.
二、術名「探身刺敵」略釋:探身劍向身前斜下刺,挺左腿以助勢。
ii. Technical name: REACH WITH YOUR BODY TO STAB THE OPPONENT
     I reach with my body, my sword stabbing diagonally downward in front of me, my left leg straightening to assist the posture.
三、動作說明:以前懷中抱月式,稍進右腿,高抬左腿,斜探身,劍向下斜刺,左訣斜向上伸助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right leg slightly advances and your left leg lifts high, your body reaching out until diagonal while the sword stabs diagonally downward, your hex extending diagonally upward to assist the posture.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 53

(五十四)怪蟒翻身(一)
54. PYTHON TURNS AROUND – Part 1

一、學名「怪蟒翻身」意義:以右脚為軸,劍擺身搖,突變形狀而名之。
i. Scholarly name: PYTHON TURNS AROUND
     Using your right foot as a pivot, the sword waves as your body sways in a sudden change of shape, hence the name.
二、術名「上撥下掛」略釋:劍先上挑以撥敵器,收左腿向前虛置,劍隨之以倒掛。
ii. Technical name: DEFLECTING UPWARD, HANGING DOWNWARD
     My sword first carries upward to deflect the opponent’s weapon, and as my left leg gathers in to be placed emptily in front of me, my sword hangs upside down.
三、動作說明:依上探海式,劍上起,轉下,劃一圓圈,倒掛胸前,同時收左腿上提隨身轉,向前虛伸,左訣附右劍裡,形略同太極劍之小奎星式。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, the sword lifts up then turns downward and traces a circle until hanging upside down in front of your chest. At the same time, your left leg gathers in along with the twisting of your body to be lifted up in front of your body, your hex near the inside edge of the sword. This is almost the same as Taiji Sword’s SMALL KUIXING POSTURE [Posture 14 in his Taiji Sword manual].
四、該式動作中間姿勢如下圖
iv. The middle of this posture’s movement is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 54

(五十五)怪蟒翻身(二)
55. PYTHON TURNS AROUND – Part 2

一、學名「怪蟒翻身」意義:以右脚為軸翻轉身軀,形態突然變化之意。
i. Scholarly name: PYTHON TURNS AROUND
     Same as explained in the previous posture.
二、術名「轉身托劍」略釋:我以上式翻轉身,劍撥托於頂上,這不過是練的姿勢,劍術不能固執,招無定式,打無定格,在人隨機應變耳。
ii. Technical name: TURN AROUND, PROPPING UP
     I continue turning around from the previous posture, my sword propping away over my head. Keep in mind these are only postures for practice. The sword art is not a rigid thing. Its techniques do not have to occur only within specific postures. There is no pattern in an actual fight, and so you will have to adapt to the situation.
三、動作說明:依上式仍以右脚為軸,右轉身,劍隨拋舞,兩脚踏成騎馬式,面向後方,劍身斜立,左訣平伸助勢。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, pivot again on your right foot, your body turning around to your right, and as the sword flings out, your feet step into a horse-riding stance facing to the Rear, the sword body standing diagonally, your hex extended level to assist the posture.
四、該式最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 55

(五十六)「登山趕月」同十三式請看前圖。
56. CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN IN PURSUIT OF THE MOON – Same as Posture 13.

(五十七)魚跳龍門
57. CARP LEAPS THE DRAGON GATE

一、學名「魚跳龍門」意義:以劍搖脚躍向右方跳進,劍由下向上伸,如魚躍然。
i. Scholarly name: CARP LEAPS THE DRAGON GATE
     The sword waves as you jump forward to the Right, then the sword extends upward from below like a fish leaping.
二、術名「躍步追擊」略釋:敵刺我,我急抄之,敵欲逃,我急躍進趕,以劍追刺之。
ii. Technical name: JUMPING STEP, CHASING ATTACK
     The opponent stabs at me and I urgently scoop it aside. If he then wants to escape, I quickly leap forward to chase him and send out my sword with a chasing stab.
三、動作說明:依上式,劍向下一抽,邁進右步向上躍起,續進左步,連進右步,作弓式,右劍稍向上伸,左成箭步,左訣斜向上伸,形同登山趕月,但此式是右弓式。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, the sword lowers and draws in, then you advance your right foot, leaping up, continuing into advancing with your left foot, then right foot, and make a stance of right bow and left arrow, the sword extending slightly upward, your hex extending diagonally upward. The posture is the same as in CLIMB THE MOUNTAIN IN PURSUIT OF THE MOON, but in this case with a right bow stance.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 57

(五十八)杏花春雨
58. APRICOT BLOSSOMS AND SPRING RAIN

一、學名「杏花春雨」意義:以劍囘刺,平劍在面前左右搖擺三次如下雨狀再挽一劍花,藏右脇下避之,故名。
i. Scholarly name: APRICOT BLOSSOMS AND SPRING RAIN
     The sword withdraws from stabbing, waves across in front of you three times like falling rain, then does a rolling flourish [as in “flower”] which brings it in to be stored below your right ribs, hence the name.
二、術名「左右摸剒」略釋:以橫劍於面前,左右摸剒數次再挽一花,作避劍式。
ii. Technical name: WIPING AND FILING TO BOTH SIDES
     My sword horizontal in front of me does a wiping and filing action side to side a few times, then does a rolling flourish to put me in a defensive posture.
三、動作說明:依上式,劍鋒囘指,變騎馬式,橫劍左右如穿梭三次,左訣隨擺,然後劍挽一花避於右脇下,右腿下蹲,左腿向前虛點地,左訣前伸上指。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, the sword withdraws pointing as you switch to a horse-riding stance, weaves back and forth three times [to the left, right, left] with your hex swinging along with it. Then the sword does a rolling flourish and settles below your right ribs, your right leg squatting down, your left leg lightly touching down forward, your hex extending forward and pointing upward.
四、該式動作最後姿勢如下圖
iv. This posture finishes its movement as in the photo below [although the text describes the position of the hands as being closer to what the hands are doing in the photo for Posture 5]:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 58

(五十九)飛龍驚虹
59. FLYING DRAGON, STARTLING RAINBOW

一、學名「飛龍驚虹」意義:全套劍法舞罷,將右手之劍,丟拋升起,劍在空中旋轉如龍形,龍起而虹散,故名。
i. Scholarly name: FLYING DRAGON, STARTLING RAINBOW
     At the end of the sword set, your right hand tosses the sword up into the air, spinning like a dragon. When the dragon rises, the rainbow gets scattered [i.e. The glinting of the spinning sword (spinning rapidly widthwise, not flipping clumsily lengthwise) creates a slight strobing effect, reminiscent of the uniqueness of seeing a nine-colored rainbow.], hence the name.
二、術名「空中收劍」略釋:以右手將劍扔於空中,劍下落時以左手接之。練手急眼快。
ii. Technical name: SWORD GOES INTO THE AIR, THEN IS GATHERED IN
     I throw the sword up into the air with my right hand, and when the sword comes down, catch it with my left hand. This trains hand-eye coordination.
三、動作說明:依上式:右手將劍扔拋旋轉升起,下落時,以左手接握劍柄,身立直,劍鋒下掛,兩目上視然後變右訣下垂。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your right hand tosses the sword up into the air with a spin. When it comes down, your left hand catches it at the handle, the body of the sword vertical, tip hanging down. Your eyes are looking upward [toward the caught handle], your hex now switched to your right hand, which is hanging down.
四、該式動作劍升起姿勢如下圖
iv. The movement of the sword flying up is as in the photo below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 59

(六十)完璧歸趙
60. RETURNING THE JADE TO ZHAO INTACT

一、學名「完璧歸趙」意義:舞劍開始前,係劍在左手交右手,劍已舞完,右劍仍歸囘左手,再歸原位置,故名。
i. Scholarly name: RETURNING THE JADE TO ZHAO INTACT
     In the beginning of the set, the sword is switched from your left hand to your right. At the end, it is returned from your right hand to your left, returning to your original position, hence the name.
二、術名「接劍還原」即左手接握空中之劍歸囘原預備式。
ii. Technical name: CATCH THE SWORD, RETURN TO THE ORIGINAL POSITION
     My left hand has caught the sword out of the air and I return to the PREPARATION POSTURE.
三、動作說明:依上式,左手腕下翻,兩臂下垂,左持劍右揑訣,左脚退後一步,右脚靠近左脚,歸還開始時之預備式。
iii. Movement description:
     Continuing from the previous posture, your left wrist turns over as both arms hang down, left hand holding the sword, right hand pinched into a hex, your left foot taking a step back, right foot following to stand next to it, returning you to the PREPARATION POSTURE at the beginning.
四、全套「驚虹劍術」完
iv. This completes the entire set.

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - posture 60

十五、驚虹劍技雜談
FIFTEEN: SOME THINGS I HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THE ART OF THE STARTLING-RAINBOW SWORD

自古劍之名稱甚多,而所舞劍術之名亦夥,如今國術界人士所舞劍術之名更繁。如純陽劍、太極劍、六合劍、八仙劍、三才劍等。不勝枚擧,昔從師學藝時各路劍法余均喜愛,尤喜驚虹,因驚虹劍術內有底母劍九式,最為精妙,第一式曰藏珍,第二式曰拒門,第三式曰偸心,第四式曰貪狼,第五式曰趕蟾,第六式曰追風,第七式曰穿梭,第八式曰望月,第九式曰探海是也。每母劍相生子劍數式,由子母劍變化串成全套劍法,進退攻守,連續不絕,尤以最後之接劍式,右手將劍上拋升起,劍在空中旋轉,以左手收接,名之為「飛龍驚虹」頗合作文章法則,前後相顧,有條不紊,收尾有力,恰合題意,一波三折,如長江大河,穿挿廻環,無不合法,可謂氣象萬千,美不勝收,非若無意義之劍術,徒以奇名而美之,旣不合乎題義,又乏前後章法,毫無內容者,所可比擬也,此所以余喜驚虹而著驚虹劍術者一也。
民國三十一年秋,隨軍遠征,駐防雲南滇西下關鎭,北去數里為大里縣城,聞該城内住戶有杜三成者,喜國術性豪爽,且有寳劍一把,余窃景之,當托友人董君引見,杜君三十餘歲,身體魁梧,言語爽快,惜嗜煙癖,余聲明來意後,問答之下,杜君慨然曰,「余曾祖原籍山東,以從軍落戶於此已四世矣,曾祖父、祖父、家父皆精武功,善國術,余幼年時父親即傳授國術基礎,並習練底母劍單式,惜余十三歲時父死於亂中。」言下不勝愴然,繼云:「雖遺寳劍一把,有劍乏術,只有留作紀念耳。」余見壁上掛劍一把,指劍而問曰:「可否請假一觀?」杜君愼重摘劍相示,余拔劍而觀之,不意鐵銹盈鞘,知久不舞練矣,劍重約五斤餘,上劍有驚虹二字隱約可見,其他小字已模糊不淸,不禁為之惋惜,繼談劍學劍術,伊均茫然,唯唯靜聽而已,時瞟睨視余,若有歉於中者,良久,董君乃以實告,伊堅請授以驚虹劍術,並云:「要對起祖上及傳該劍之旨」,余曰:「敎授則不敢,研究可也。」即以母劍化子劍各式一一詳傳,從此交誼甚篤,不時過從,二年之久,公私蒙其協助者良多,余力勸其戒絕煙癮,献身國家,方為中華男兒,伊唯唯稱是,願遵所言,至勝利復原,余隨軍北上,迨民國三十八年雲南變色,書函斷絕,杜君慷慨尚義,正氣不阿,絕不為匪所容,關山隔阻,十年之久渺無信息,存歿難知,憶前情,念故交,此所以著驚虹劍者二也,北望中原,白雲蒼狗,追懷良友,情何以堪,茲著此驚虹劍術亦藉作紀念耳。
Since ancient times, there have been a great many famous swords as well as great many sword arts, and nowadays there are more sword arts than ever before, such as Chunyang Sword, Taiji Sword, Six Unions Sword, Eight Immortals Sword, Triple-Substance Sword, and so on, too many to count. I have loved all the various sword sets I have learned from my teachers, but my favorite is the Startling-Rainbow Sword. [Being an example of the external school, he would presumably have received it from his earlier teacher, Fu Tingjie. As for the origin of the set’s name, a story goes that there was a meditating man who noticed a surprising rainbow. He was startled when he realized he was looking at a rainbow that had not merely the usual seven colors, but nine – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet, plus yin-ness and yang-ness – and the sight of it, or perhaps we should say the insight of it, sparked his enlightenment.] The most exquisite thing about it is its “nine mother techniques” [one technique for each of the nine colors, though without any indication of a coordinating of the techniques with specific colors]:
     1. HIDING THE TREASURE [or NEEDLE – see Posture 7]
     2. BLOCKING THE DOORWAY [Postures 12 and 16]
     3. STEALING THE HEART [Posture 20]
     4. GREEDY AS A WOLF [Postures 22, 35, 49]
     5. CHASING THE MOON [Posture 28]
     6. CHASING LIKE THE WIND [Posture 31]
     7. WORKING THE SHUTTLES [Posture 37]
     8. GAZING AT THE MOON [Posture 48]
     9. SEARCHING THE SEA [Posture 53]
     Each of these mother techniques gives birth to several offspring techniques. These mother and son techniques are linked together, switching back and forth, to make the complete sword set, advancing and retreating, attacking and defending, continuously and without pause. [The “mother” would seem to have had three or four children, as the mother techniques occupy less than a quarter of the list of names.] Of particular note is the posture of catching the sword at the conclusion, in which your right hand tosses the sword up so that it is rotating in the air and then your left hand catches it, called FLYING DRAGON, STARTLING RAINBOW.
     It conforms with an established set of principles, a thoughtfulness as to how movements precede and follow each other, staying methodical all the way to the end, and lives up to its theory, twisting and turning like the Yangtze or Yellow rivers weaving through and winding back, always adhering to its rules, and can be said to have such a spirit of variety to its techniques that it has a beauty which cannot be fully absorbed. It is not like the meaningless sword arts that simply seek to be different and pretty rather than representative of a theory, have no proper composition from movement to movement, and are the equivalent of something that has no content at all. This is why I am so fond of the Startling-Rainbow Sword and is one reason why I have written this book.
     In the autumn of 1942, my army was sent on a long trek to the Xiaguan garrison in western Yunnan. A few miles north was the city of Dali. I had heard that living there was a man named Du Sancheng who was a lover of martial arts and possessed a precious sword, so I snuck away to visit him and was introduced to him by a trusted friend of mine named Dong.
     Du was in his thirties, had a stalwart build and a frankness of speech, but unfortunately he also had a smoking addiction. I then told him my purpose in coming and asked him many questions, to which he generously replied:
     “My great-grandfather lived in Shandong. After joining the army, the family settled here and stayed for four generations. My great-grandfather, grandfather, and father all had military accomplishments and were experts in martial arts. When I was a child, my father taught me the fundamentals of martial arts and I practiced the mother sword techniques as individual postures. Unfortunately, when I was thirteen, he died in the fighting.” [This is probably referring to the Yunnan-Guangxi War, 1925.] He stopped talking for a moment, overcome with sorrow, then continued: “Even though I’ve inherited a precious sword, I have the sword but lack the art, and so I only keep it as a memento.”
     I looked up at the sword hanging on the wall, and I pointed to it and asked if he would mind if I take a look at it. Du carefully took it down and showed it to me. I unsheathed the sword and examined it. I did not expect there to be so much rust in the scabbard and could tell it had not been practiced with for a long time. The weight of it was around five pounds or more. Inscribed on the sword were the barely discernible words “Startling Rainbow” as well as some other smaller words that already become too indistinct to read. I could not help but feel what a pity it was.
     We continued to talk of sword training and sword arts, but he mostly listened quietly, contributing agreement from time to time, until he gave me a look that seemed full of regret. After a while, Dong made this clear, explaining that Du was inviting me to teach him the Startling-Rainbow Sword art, and Du said: “I want to do my forefathers proud and pass down their sword art.”
     I told him: “I wouldn’t presume to ‘teach’ you. But we can ‘study’ it together.” [This is not just Yin being polite, since Du had already learned much of the Startling-Rainbow Sword art from his father, having drilled the basics with the nine mother techniques.] So we proceeded to go through each of the mother techniques and offspring techniques in detail. Henceforth we had a deep and constant friendship for the next two years in which I received a great deal of help from him both publicly and privately. I strongly encouraged him to quit smoking and devote himself to his nation as a true Chinaman [smoking being a vulgar import from Western culture]. He agreed to comply with this and rehabilitate himself. My army was then sent north.
     In 1949, Yunnan was transformed and correspondence ceased. Du was generous and upright, righteous and decent, not a bit like a bandit lurking in the hills [a stereotype about people from Yunnan]. It has been more than ten years now and I have received no information. It is difficult to know whether he is alive or has passed on. I remember with affection when I think of our friendship, and this is the second reason I have written this book. When I gaze northward to China, white-clouded and green-bumped over the horizon, I think of my friend and am overpowered with sentiment. This book is dedicated to his memory.

十六、論造劍法
SIXTEEN: ON THE MAKING OF SWORDS

歷代相傳之經驗,以大冶鑛產出鐵質鑄劍為最佳,在實際考究,他處所產之鐵,如一斤下爐鍛鍊,其所餘之鐵精不及一兩。終不若楚鐵得精多而用工少,常鐵甚而鍊盡而終不得精者,枉費工料。他如鄕間破土種田之鐵器鋤鍬之類,又山地常用車輪外之鐵瓦,騾馬蹄掌之鐵等滑極將穿,皆久經磨鍊,朝夕動用,是以火氣化盡,遂成絕熟之物,鑄劍最佳,中經火鍊水鍊,鍊至不落屑片為度,蓋錘鍊時所落痂片,即渣滓也,渣滓鍊盡,餘為鐵精,如洗麵筋然,洗鍊至麵盡而成純筋,與鐵鍊精之法亦然,以此做劍,堅而且利,經久不銹,古人鑄劍心誠意堅,開鍊之日,選庚子午時,向西方禱告,西方屬金,故造劍者用之,不計耗神費力,千錘萬折,歷盡心血,造劍旣成,親手持磨,堅硬鋒利,斬釘截鐵,不能損壞,所謂折鐵寳劍者是也。
今非昔比,器械昌明,以用途異殊,關於鑄劍不必勞神費力,消耗巨大時光與精神,只求其輕重應手,尺寸合度,輕巧玲瓏利於習舞而已,劍之長度以英尺三尺四寸為度,與古劍略同,惟今人身材大都稍短於古人,則須以身材長短而製定之,以身材試驗法,即以手反持劍柄喜長者,劍鋒與頭齊,喜短者與耳齊亦可,余以高於耳不出於頭為宜,又劍鋒豎地直立,劍柄之雲頭與臍齊,亦符合劍之尺度也。
大槪普通劍全長以英尺為三尺四寸,以公尺計全長為一公尺,茲以公尺計算,除雲頭占四公分許,柄把占十四公分,把在手要合度,護偃又占五公分許,劍身長不過七公寸七公分,即七十七公分,劍之寬度約三公分三四,漸下漸收狹,窄到快至劍鋒約二公分三四,尖頭狀似瓜子米,形如飄帶,此雄劍之勢也,脊厚如瓜子,刄後如瓜子米兩面拱背,重量以一公斤許為宜,視力量身材大小高低而製定,以取其靈活輕快為尚,不可開刄,倘過於鋒利,易於致傷。
劍之裝璜宜雅不宜俗,宜堅不宜華,在取其大方美觀,昔有貴宦巨室亦有獨樹奇樣者,或把嵌象牙四面穿花,或魚骨嵌金,法藍渡銀,鑲以珍寳,沙魚皮裏,鞘嵌珠翠,玉鑲外壳,五色絲帶,纒金鏤銀,蝠頭環套,不一而足,掛於壁間,佩於身旁,此不過充擺設壯觀瞻而已,今非昔比,當去俗靡誇耀之態,脫盡浮華之氣為尚,但物隨主愛而飾之,亦不必拘泥也。茲附木製劍型及鑄劍模型如下:
From experience throughout history, it was discovered that smelted iron was the best material for casting swords. People went out and investigated fastidiously for more places that had iron ore. If they refined a pound of it in a furnace, they were left with an ounce of pure iron. If in the end they did not get enough pure iron out of the process, it was effectively useless to work with. It was common for iron ore to be fully smelted and yet not sufficiently refined, making it all a waste of effort. But another way came along. If a village was tilling ground using iron hoes, or the carts in hilly areas used carts with iron wheel-hubs, or iron horseshoes had become smooth with wear, the iron had in such cases been tempered by long-term daily use. The fire applied to this used iron was thus fully transformative and the ingots achieved were extremely pure, optimum for casting swords. In the midst of fire-and-water smelting, pieces did not fall off, then while hammering it, crusty fragments would come away. These dregs would be fully smelted and what was left was pure iron. This method of getting pure iron is rather like grinding down wheat to make a usable flour.
     By this means, swords were made that were hard, sharp, durable, and unrusting. Ancient people cast swords with great sincerity. The day they set to work was the thirty-seventh day of the cycle of sixty, at noon. They faced to the west and offered prayers for the metals from the western mountains. They did not care how hard the work was going to be, and with a thousand hammerings and ten thousand foldings, they put all of their heart into it. The finished sword was then hand polished until it was so hard and the edge was so keen that it could chop nails in half or slice through a piece of iron without being at all damaged. Thus the phrase “folded steel, precious sword”.
     The present is different from the past. Machinery is well-developed and highly specialized. Regarding the casting of swords, it is no longer necessary to devote as much labor, time, or spirit to it, only to get the weight and length right so that it suits the dexterity required when practicing. The standard length for a sword is three feet, four inches. This is almost the same as with ancient swords, but modern people are generally somewhat shorter in stature than ancient people. [With the improved quality of nutrition in Asia over the many decades since this book was written, this trend has of course completely reversed.] Thus physical build has to be the basis upon which swords are made. To conform the sword length to your body, hold the handle in a reverse grip with your left hand. The sword tip should reach no farther than headtop level and go at least as far as ear level, though I myself think it is best to go by ear height rather than head height. [He does not specify whether it is to be level with the top of the ear or the earlobe, but he seems to mean the top of the ear, going by the photo for Posture 1.] Another way is stand the sword vertically with the tip on the ground, in which case the pommel should be at navel level.
    The ordinary overall length of the whole sword is three feet and four inches, or 1 meter.
The breakdown of that meter is thus: The pommel takes up about 4 cm, the handle 14 cm, being the proper length to fit the grip of a hand, the hilt about 5 cm, and the sword body 77 cm.
     The width of the sword body is about 3.75 cm, gradually tapering so that at the tip it is about 2.75 cm. The tip is the equivalent of a melon seed so it is rounded like a silken streamer curving in the air. This is the manner of a heroic sword. The spine is also like a melon seed, as is the rear section of the blade bulging to both sides of the spine.
     The appropriate weight is about two and a quarter pounds.
     These measurements are made according to average strength, build, size, and height, and are gauged to provide for the most nimbleness and agility.
     The sword must not be overly sharpened, for if it is too sharp, you will easily cut yourself.
     Decoration on a sword should be sophisticated rather than common, as well as potent rather than flashy. It should be tasteful and artistic. In ancient times, high-ranking officials had handles made of unique wood or of ivory with intricate engraving or of fishbone with gold inlay, the flanges made of silver and inlaid with jewels, the scabbard of sandfish skin inlaid with pearls and jade, the jade mounted with an outer shell, colorfully sashed and wrapped with gold engraved with silver, topped with a hanging ring so that at numerous sites it could be hung on a wall for there to be decoration by one’s side. But this is nothing more than a display of splendor. The present is different from the past, and we should dispense with such a vulgar drive to flaunt and instead admire those who do not put on airs. However, people will follow the example of leaders who adore decoration and we do not really need to be picky about it. Below are the patterns for wood swords and cast iron swords:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - drawing 1

木劍形
Wooden sword:

雲頭 pommel
柄把 handle
護偃 hilt
劍板 edge
劍身 body
劍鋒 tip

鑄鐵劍法,先鑄劍胚,再裝護偃,柄把,上扣雲頭,雲頭繫絲穗,即成完全之劍,模型如下:
Method for assembling the cast iron sword: first cast the blade, then make the hilt, then the handle, then the pommel, and then onto the pommel can be tied the silk tassel. The completed sword is as below:

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - drawing 2

雲頭 pommel [4]
木柄 handle [3]
護偃 hilt [2]
劍胚 blade [step 1]

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - drawing 3

裝飾完備圖
The adorned finished sword

《驚虹劍術》 尹千合 (1960) - drawing 4


L [pommel]
戌 酉
K [thread hole] / J [lower flange]
申 未
I [handle]  / H [upper flange]
午 巳
G [outer hilt] / F [inner hilt]
辰 卯
E [outer edge] / D [inner edge]
寅 丑
C [outer tip] / B [inner tip]

A [point]

鑄劍完成後,應製劍匣亦名劍鞘,隨劍之長短寬窄而定製,以木為壳,外裹沙魚皮或蛇皮,不獨美觀,且能避濕防銹,外飾鐵箍或銅箍,防久不裂,鞘底包以鐵邊取其耐磨,總之以求堅固耐用大方美觀,而不必過尚華飾,余昔學藝時只知有劍可用,並不研究製劍之法,以余用劍之經驗,擬定大槪尺寸作一參考,其長短厚薄輕重在用劍者自行選擇,劍鞘恰合劍身,如足穿鞋,求其適宜,巧匠自會精製,自可隨心應手,現寳島能製劍者甚多,當較余所談更為詳盡高明,以身材體力長短大小而選購之,自能得心應手,夫今人多體弱,意氣消沉,欲矯惰氣激壯志,習劍為不二法門,倘人手一劍,晨昏婆娑起舞,抖擻精神,自立奮發,足以壯士氣而振人心,其俾助於復國大業,豈淺鮮哉。
Once a sword has been made, a corresponding scabbard is also made, according to the sword’s length and width. The case is made of wood and wrapped with either sandfish skin or snake skin, not merely for the sake of beauty, but also to keep out moisture to prevent rusting. It is wrapped with ornamental bands of either iron or copper to prevent the case from eventually splitting, and the bottom end of the scabbard is encased in iron to keep the scabbard tip wear-resistant. In short, it should be sturdy and durable, tasteful and elegant, and does not need to be excessively decorative.
     In the days when I was learning the art, I knew only how swords could be used and did not study how they were made. Based on my experience of using swords, I have determined general measurements for the sake of reference. The length, thickness, and weight of the sword you use will depend on what best suits you. The sword scabbard should suit the sword body so that it is like a foot fitting perfectly into a shoe.
     Skilled workers put in extra care so you will be able to perform with your hand what is in your mind. There are currently a great many makers of swords in Taiwan and they can discuss it in much better detail than I can. Purchase a sword based on your build, strength, height, and size, and then you will naturally be able to become proficient.
     Many people nowadays are weak and despondent, and hope their lofty aspirations will surge to fruition without their actually having to do anything. But the only proper method of approaching sword practice is to pick up a sword and practice all day. By awakening your spirit and exerting yourself with determination, you will set an example capable of boosting morale and inspiring popular sentiment that will assist in the great task of recovering our lost country, no meager achievement.

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